Etymology
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anthropometric (adj.)
"pertaining to the measurements of the human body," 1871, based on French anthropométrique, from anthropometry "measurement of the human body" + -ic.
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anthropomorphism (n.)
1753, "the ascription of human qualities to a deity," from anthropomorphous + -ism. Of other non-human things, from 1858. Related: Anthropomorphist (1610s).
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anthropomorphic (adj.)
1806, "involving the attribution of human qualities to divine beings," from anthropomorphous + -ic. Originally in reference to regarding God or gods as having human form and human characteristics; of animals, plants, nature, etc. by 1858. Related: Anthropomorphical.
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unhuman (adj.)
1540s, "inhumane, cruel," from un- (1) "not" + human (adj.). Meaning "destitute of human qualities; superhuman" is from 1782.
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humankind (n.)
"the human species," 1640s, from human + kind (n.). Originally two words. Middle English had humaigne lynage "humankind" (mid-15c.).
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drama (n.)

1510s, "a composition presenting in dialogue a course of human action, the description of a story converted into the action of a play," from Late Latin drama "play, drama," from Greek drama (genitive dramatos) "action, deed; play, spectacle," from drāo "to do, make, act, perform" (especially some great deed, whether good or bad), which is of uncertain etymology.

Meaning "theatrical literature generally, drama as art" is from 1660s. Extended sense of "sequence of events or actions leading up to a climax" is by 1714. Drama queen "person who habitually responds to situations in a melodramatic way" is attested by 1992.

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cannibalism (n.)
"the eating of human flesh by human beings," 1796, from cannibal + -ism. Perhaps from French cannibalisme, which is attested from the same year.
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anthropopathy (n.)

"ascription of human feelings to divine beings," 1640s, from Greek anthrōpopatheia "humanity," literally "human feeling," from anthrōpos "man, human" (see anthropo-) + -patheia, combining form of pathos "suffering, disease, feeling" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer"). Related: Anthropopathic; anthropopathite; anthropopathically.

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imprecation (n.)

mid-15c., "a curse, cursing," from Latin imprecationem (nominative imprecatio) "an invoking of evil," noun of action from past participle stem of imprecari "invoke, pray, call down upon," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, within" (from PIE root *en "in") + precari "to pray, ask, beg, request" (from PIE root *prek- "to ask, entreat"). "Current limited sense is characteristic of human nature" [Weekley].

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apanthropy (n.)

"aversion to human company, love of solitude," 1753, nativized form of Greek apanthropia, abstract noun from apanthropos "unsocial," from assimilated form of apo "off, away from" (see apo-) + anthrōpos "man, human" (see anthropo-). Related: Apanthropic.

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