Etymology
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Esperanto (n.)
1892, from Doktoro Esperanto, whose name means in Esperanto, "one who hopes," pen name used on the title page of a book about the artificial would-be universal language published 1887 by its Polish-born creator, Lazarus Ludwig Zamenhof (1859-1917). Compare Spanish esperanza "hope," from esperar, from Latin sperare "hope" (see sperate). For initial e- see e-.
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death-warrant (n.)

1690s, "warrant of capital execution from proper authority," from death + warrant (n.). Figurative sense of "anything which puts an end to hope or expectation" is from 1874.

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desperate (adj.)

c. 1400, desperat, of persons, "despairing, hopeless" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin desperatus "given up, despaired of," past participle of desperare "to despair, to lose all hope," from de "without" (see de-) + sperare "to hope," from spes "hope" (from PIE root *spes- "prosperity;" see speed (n.)).

Of persons, "without care for safety, extremely rash, driven to recklessness by despair," from late 15c.; weakened sense of "having a great desire for" is from 1950s. Of conditions, "extremely serious," from 1550s. Of actions, "done or resorted to without regard for consequences," 1570s. Related: Desperately; desperateness.

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disappointment (n.)

1610s, "defeat or failure of hope or expectation," from French désappointement or else a native formation from disappoint + -ment. Meaning "feeling of being disappointed" is from 1756. Meaning "a thing that disappoints" is from 1756.

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unblown (adj.)

"not yet bloomed," 1580s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of blow (v.2).

Life is the rose's hope while yet unblown;
The reading of an ever-changing tale;
[Keats, from "Sleep and Poetry"]
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despondence (n.)

"despondent condition, a sinking or dejection of spirit from loss of hope or courage in affliction or difficulty," 1670s, from Latin despondentem (nominative despondens), present participle of despondere "to give up, lose, lose heart, resign," also "to promise in marriage" (especially in phrase animam despondere, literally "give up one's soul"), etymologically "to promise to give something away," from de "away" (see de-) + spondere "to promise" (see sponsor (n.)).

Despondency is a loss of hope sufficient to produce a loss of courage and a disposition to relax or relinquish effort, the despondent person tending to sink into spiritless inaction. Despair means a total loss of hope; despondency does not. [Century Dictionary, 1897]
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trow (v.)
Old English treowan "to trust in, believe, hope, be confident; persuade, suggest; make true; be faithful (to), confederate with," from treow "faith, belief," from Proto-Germanic *treuwaz "having or characterized by good faith" (source also of Old Saxon truon, Old Frisian trouwa, Dutch vertrouwen "trust," Old High German triuwen, German trauen "hope, believe, trust"), "having or characterized by good faith," from PIE *drew-o-, a suffixed form of the root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast."
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Bushman (n.)
one of an aboriginal tribe near the Cape of Good Hope, 1785, from South African Dutch boschjesman, literally "man of the bush," from boschje, from Dutch bosje, diminutive of bosch, bos (see bush (n.)).
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expectancy (n.)

"act or state of expecting; anticipatory belief or desire," 1590s, from Medieval Latin expectantia, from Latin expectans/exspectans (present participle of expectare/exspectare "await, desire, hope;" see expect) + -ancy. Related: Expectance.

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West Indies 
Caribbean islands explored by Columbus, 1550s, reflecting the belief (or hope) that they were western outliers of the Indies of Asia. Related: West Indian, which is from 1580s in reference to the native inhabitants, 1650s in reference to European settlers there, and 1928 in reference to people of West Indian ancestry.
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