Etymology
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boyhood (n.)

"state of being a boy; the early period of a male's life," 1745, from boy + -hood.

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hoodie (n.)
also hoody, slang shortening of hooded sweatshirt, attested by 1991; see hood (n.1). Earlier (1789) it was a familiar term for the hooded crow.
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nationhood (n.)

"state of being a nation," 1840, from nation + -hood.

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fatherhood (n.)
early 14c., faderhade; see father (n.) + -hood.
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maidenhood (n.)

"state of being a maiden; state of an unmarried female; virginity," Old English mægdenhad; see maiden (n.) + -hood.

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widowhood (n.)
c. 1200, from widow (n.) + -hood. Modifying or replacing Old English wuduwanhad "state of a woman who has no husband."
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adulthood (n.)

"state or condition of being an adult," 1850, from adult (adj.) + -hood. Adultness is attested from 1731.

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parenthood (n.)

"state of being a parent; position of a parent," 1856, from parent (n.) + -hood.

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motherhood (n.)

"state or fact of being a mother," 1590s, from mother (n.1) + -hood. Earlier was moderhede "motherhead" (mid-14c.).

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hoodwink (v.)
1560s, "to blindfold, blind by covering the eyes," from hood (n.1) + wink (n.); figurative sense of "blind the mind, mislead, deceive by disguise" is c. 1600. Related: Hoodwinked; hoodwinking.
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