Etymology
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adulthood (n.)
1850, from adult (adj.) + -hood. Adultness is attested from 1731.
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boyhood (n.)

"state of being a boy; the early period of a male's life," 1745, from boy + -hood.

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-hood 
word-forming element meaning "state or condition of being," from Old English -had "condition, quality, position" (as in cildhad "childhood," preosthad "priesthood," werhad "manhood"), cognate with German -heit/-keit, Dutch -heid, Old Frisian and Old Saxon -hed, all from Proto-Germanic *haidus "manner, quality," literally "bright appearance," from PIE (s)kai- (1) "bright, shining" (Cognates: Sanskrit ketu "brightness, appearance"). Originally a free-standing word (see hade); in Modern English it survives only in this suffix.
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hoodie (n.)
also hoody, slang shortening of hooded sweatshirt, attested by 1991; see hood (n.1). Earlier (1789) it was a familiar term for the hooded crow.
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nationhood (n.)

"state of being a nation," 1840, from nation + -hood.

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fatherhood (n.)
early 14c., faderhade; see father (n.) + -hood.
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apprenticeship (n.)
1590s; see apprentice (n.) + -ship. Replaced earlier apprenticehood (late 14c., with -hood).
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maidenhood (n.)

"state of being a maiden; state of an unmarried female; virginity," Old English mægdenhad; see maiden (n.) + -hood.

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widowhood (n.)
c. 1200, from widow (n.) + -hood. Modifying or replacing Old English wuduwanhad "state of a woman who has no husband."
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parenthood (n.)

"state of being a parent; position of a parent," 1856, from parent (n.) + -hood.

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