Etymology
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sanctum (n.)
1570s, "holy place of the Jewish tabernacle," from Latin sanctum "a holy place," as in Late Latin sanctum sanctorum "holy of holies" (translating Greek to hagion ton hagiou, translating Hebrew qodesh haqqodashim), from neuter of sanctus "holy" (see saint (n.)). In English, sanctum sanctorum attested from c. 1400; in sense of "a person's private retreat" from 1706.
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hagiarchy (n.)
"government by persons in holy orders," 1826 (Southey, "Vindiciae Ecclesiae Anglicanae"); see hagio- "holy" + -archy "rule." Not to be confused with hagiocracy "government by persons considered holy" (1816), with -cracy.
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Heligoland 
island in the North Sea off Germany, from the same source as German heilig "holy" (see holy), in reference to an ancient shrine there.
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halibut (n.)
large flatfish, early 15c., perhaps from hali "holy" (see holy) + butte "flatfish" (see butt (n.4)). Supposedly so called from its being eaten on holy days (compare cognate Dutch heilbot, Low German heilbutt, Swedish helgeflundra, Danish helleflynder).
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Aquarian (adj.)
"pertaining to the zodiacal sign of Aquarius," 1940 in reference to the astrological Age of Aquarius (see Aquarius + -ian). Earlier, "one who uses water instead of wine at the Eucharist" (1580s).
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holiness (n.)
Middle English holinesse, from Old English halignis "state or character of being holy, sanctity, religion; holy thing;" see holy + -ness. Compare Old High German heilagnissa. As title of the Pope (mid-15c. in English), it translates Latin sanctitas (until c. 600 also applied to bishops).
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Jerome 

masc. proper name, from French Jérome, from Late Latin Hieronymus, from Greek Hieronymos, literally "holy name," from hieros "holy" (see ire) + onyma, dialectal form of onoma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

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Mogadishu 
city in Somalia, from Arabic mukaddas "holy."
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hallow (v.)
Old English halgian "to make holy, sanctify; to honor as holy, consecrate, ordain," related to halig "holy," from Proto-Germanic *hailagon (source also of Old Saxon helagon, Middle Dutch heligen, Old Norse helga), from PIE root *kailo- "whole, uninjured, of good omen" (see health). Used in Christian translations to render Latin sanctificare. Related: Hallowed; hallowing.
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