Etymology
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suspenders (n.)
"straps for holding up trousers, etc.," 1806, American English, plural agent noun from suspend (v.).
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oil-can (n.)

"can for holding oil," especially one with a long, narrow, tapering spout, used to oil machinery, 1839, from oil (n.) + can (n.).

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bookcase (n.)
also book-case, "case with shelves for holding books," 1726, from book (n.) + case (n.2). An Old English word for this was bocfodder.
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match-book (n.)

also matchbook, in reference to a folder holding fire-starting safety matches, 1913, from match (n.1) + book (n.).

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teabag (n.)
also tea-bag 1857, a small permeable packet for holding loose tea, from tea + bag (n.). As a sex act, by 2000.
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kickstand (n.)
also kick-stand, "metal support for holding a bicycle upright," 1936, from kick (n.) + stand (n.). So called for the method of putting it in position.
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jilt (v.)
"to deceive (especially after holding out hopes), discard after encouraging," 1670s; earlier "to cheat, trick" (1660s); of uncertain origin (see jilt (n.)). Related: Jilted; jilting.
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undignified (adj.)
1680s, of clergy, "not holding a position of dignity," from un- (1) "not" + dignified. Meaning "lacking in dignity of manner" is attested from 1782.
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oligarch (n.)

"one of a few holding political power, member of an oligarchy," c. 1600, from French olygarche, oligarque, from Latinized form of Greek oligarkhēs, which is related to oligarkhia "government by the few" (see oligarchy).

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sawhorse (n.)
"support or rack for holding wood while it is cut by a saw," 1778, from saw (n.1) + horse (n.) in the mechanical sense.
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