Etymology
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held 

Old English heold, past tense and past participle of hold (v.).

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stronghold (n.)

early 14c., from strong (adj.) + hold (n.) "fortified place, refuge."

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holdover (n.)

1888, from verbal phrase; see hold (v.) over (adv.), which is attested from 1640s (intransitive) "remain in office beyond the regular term;" 1852 (transitive) "reserve till a later time."

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shareholder (n.)

"one who owns shares in a joint-stock or incorporated company," c. 1830, from share (n.1) in the financial sense + agent noun from hold (v.).

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leasehold (n.)

also lease-hold, "a tenure by lease, real estate held under a lease," 1720, from lease (n.) + hold (n.). Related: Leaseholder.

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holding (n.)

early 13c., "act of holding;" mid-15c. as "that which is held," verbal noun of hold (v.). Old English healding meant "keeping, observance." As a football (soccer) penalty, from 1866. Meaning "property held," especially stock shares, is from 1570s. Holding operation is from 1942.

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foothold (n.)

1620s, "that which sustains the feet and prevents them from slipping," from foot (n.) + hold (n.). Figurative use by 1650s: "stable ground from which to act" (compare sense evolution in footing).

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freehold (n.)

"landed estate in possession of a freeman," late 15c., later generalized to any outright ownership of land, a translation of Anglo-French fraunc tenement; see free (adj.) + hold (n.1).

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halt (n.)

"a stop, a halting," 1590s, from French halte (16c.) or Italian alto, ultimately from German Halt, imperative from Old High German halten "to hold" (see hold (v.)). A German military command borrowed into the Romanic languages 16c.

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stake-holder (n.)

also stakeholder, 1708, "one with whom bets are deposited when a wager is made," from stake (n.2) + agent noun from hold (v.). Originally one with whom bets are deposited when a wager is made. By 1965 as "one who has something to gain or lose" (in a business, etc.), "one who has an interest in" (something).

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