Etymology
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interstate (adj.)
1838, American English, in reference to traffic in slaves, from inter- "between" + state (n.) in the U.S. sense. Interstate commerce is that carried on by persons in one U.S. state with persons in another. Noun sense of "an interstate highway" is attested by 1975, American English.
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milestone (n.)

also mile-stone, "stone or pillar set up on a highway or other line of travel to mark the distance in miles," 1746, from mile + stone (n.).

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roadway (n.)

"a highway; the part of a road used by horses and vehicles," c. 1600, from road (n.), perhaps preserving some of that word's old sense of "a riding," + way (n.).

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via (prep.)

1779, from Latin via "by way of," ablative form of via "way, road, path, highway, channel, course" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle," which is also the source of English way (n.)).

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headway (n.)
c. 1300, "main road, highway," from Old English heafodweg; see head (adj.) + way (n.). Sense of "motion forward" first attested 1748, short for ahead-way; ultimately nautical (compare leeway).
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scamp (n.)

1782, "highway robber," probably from dialectal verb scamp "to roam" (1753, perhaps from 16c.), which is shortened from scamper. By 1808 in a general sense of "fugitive, vagabond, swindler, mean villain;" used in the affectionate sense of "rascal" since 1837.

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beltway (n.)
term in U.S. for a ring highway around an urban area, especially Interstate 495 around Washington, D.C., the Capital Beltway, completed 1964; from belt (n.) + way (n.). Since c. 1978 used figurative for "Washington, D.C., and its culture" for better or worse.
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ramp (n.1)

1778, "slope," from French rampe, a back-formation from Old French verb ramper "to climb, scale, mount;" see ramp (v.). Meaning "road on or off a major highway" is from 1952, American English. Older sense (now obsolete or archaic) was "a leap, spring, bound" (1670s); earlier still, "a climbing plant" (late 15c.).

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trivium (n.)

by 1751, from Medieval Latin trivium (9c.) "grammar, rhetoric, and logic," the first three of the seven liberal arts, considered initiatory and foundational to the other four (arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music). From Latin trivium, in classical Latin "place where three roads meet; a frequented place; public street, highway," from tri- "three" (see three) + via "road" (see via). Compare trivia and also see quadrivium.

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laid (adj.)

"put or set down," 17c. adjectival use of past tense and past participle of lay (v.). Laid-up "injured, sick, incapacitated," originally was a nautical term (1769) describing a ship moored in harbor. Laid off "temporarily unemployed" is from 1916 (see layoff). Slang get laid "have sex" (with someone) attested from 1952, American English. Laid-back (adj.) "relaxed" is first attested 1973, perhaps in reference to the posture of highway motorcyclists.

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