Etymology
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wasabi (n.)

herb root used in cooking, 1903, from Japanese.

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wort (n.)

"a plant," Old English wyrt "root, herb, vegetable, plant, spice," from Proto-Germanic *wurtiz (source also of Old Saxon wurt, Old Norse, Danish urt, Old High German wurz "plant, herb," German Wurz, Gothic waurts, Old Norse rot "root"), from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root." St. John's wort attested from 15c.

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quinoa (n.)

annual herb native to Peru, Chile, etc., much cultivated for its seeds, 1620s, from Spanish spelling of Quechua (Inca) kinua.

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mint (n.1)

aromatic herb, plant of the genus Mentha, Old English minte (8c.), from West Germanic *minta (source also of Old Saxon minta, Middle Dutch mente, Old High German minza, German Minze), a borrowing from Latin menta, mentha "mint," itself from Greek minthe, personified as a nymph transformed into an herb by Proserpine, which is probably a loan-word from a lost Mediterranean language. For mint-julep, see julep.

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chive (n.)

common name of an edible herb closely related to garlic, c. 1400, from Old North French chive (Old French, Modern French cive, 13c.), from Latin cepa "onion" (see onion).

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blood-root (n.)

1570s, name of a European plant with red-colored roots, from blood (n.) + root (n.). The name later was transferred to an early-flowering North American herb with the same property.

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milfoil (n.)

"yarrow," a composite herb, mid-13c., from Old French milfoil, from Latin millefolium, literally "thousand leaf," so called from the abundance of its leaves; from mille "thousand" (see million) + folium "leaf" (from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom").

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labrum (n.)

lip or lip-like part, 1816, in various anatomical and zoological uses, from Latin labrum "a lip," cognate with labium "lip" (see lip (n.)). The same word is also noted in Middle English as the name of some herb.

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chervil (n.)

type of garden herb, Old English cerfelle "chervil," from Latin chaerephyllum, from Greek khairephyllon; second element phyllon "leaf" (from suffixed form of root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom"); first element perhaps from khairein "to rejoice" (from PIE root *gher- (2) "to like, want").

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vermouth (n.)

white wine flavored with aromatic herbs, 1806, from French vermouth (18c.), from German Wermuth "wormwood," from Middle High German wermuot, from Old High German wermuota (see wormwood), name of the aromatic herb formerly used in the flavoring of the liqueur.

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