Etymology
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notary (n.)

c. 1300, notarie, "a clerk, a personal secretary; person whose vocation was making notes or memoranda of the acts of others who wished to preserve them, and writing up deeds and contracts," from Old French notarie "scribe, clerk, secretary" (12c.) and directly from Latin notarius "shorthand writer, clerk, secretary," from notare, "to note," from nota "shorthand character, letter, note" (see note (n.)).

Meaning "person authorized to draw up and authenticate contracts and other legal instruments" is from mid-14c.; especially in notary public (late 15c.), which has the French order of subject-adjective. Related: Notarial.

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ag (n.)

abbreviation of agriculture, attested from 1830s (in Secretary of Ag., etc.); by 1880s in reference to college courses, American English.

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convalescent (adj.)

"recovering strength and health after sickness," 1650s, from French convalescent, from Latin convalescentem (nominative convalescens), present participle of convalescere "thrive, regain health, begin to grow strong or well," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + valescere "to begin to grow strong," inchoative of valere "to be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong").

As a noun, "one who is recovering strength and health after sickness or debility," attested from 1758.

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sanitarium (n.)

1829, "an improper form for sanatorium" [Century Dictionary], meant to indicate "place dedicated to health," perhaps based on sanitary or from Latin sanitas "health," from sanus "healthy; sane" (see sane).

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healthy (adj.)

1550s, "being in a sound state;" also "conducive to health," from health + -y (2). Earlier in the same sense was healthsome (1530s). Related: Healthily; healthiness.

It is wrong to say that certain articles of food are healthy or unhealthy. Wholesome and unwholesome are the right words. A pig may be healthy or unhealthy while alive; but after he is killed and becomes pork, he can enjoy no health, and suffer no sickness. [Eliza Leslie, "Miss Leslie's Behaviour Book," Philadelphia, 1839]

Healthsome is from 1530s in the sense "bestowing health."

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convalescence (n.)

"a gradual recovery of strength and health after a sickness," late 15c., from French convalescence (15c.), from Late Latin convalescentia "a regaining of health," from convalescentem (nominative convalescens), present participle of Latin convalescere"thrive, regain health, begin to grow strong or well," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + valescere "to begin to grow strong," inchoative of valere "to be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). Related: Convalescency.

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hail (interj.)

salutation in greeting, c. 1200, from Old Norse heill "health, prosperity, good luck," or a similar Scandinavian source, and in part from Old English shortening of wæs hæil "be healthy" (see health; and compare wassail).

The interj. hail is thus an abbreviated sentence expressing a wish, 'be whole,' i. e., be in good health, and equiv. to L. salve, plural salvete, or ave, plural avete .... [Century Dictionary]
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biohazard (n.)
also bio-hazard, "organic material that carries a significant health risk," 1973, from bio- + hazard (n.).
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gesundheit (interj.)

1914, from German Gesundheit, literally "health!", from Old High German gisunt, gisunti "healthy" (see sound (adj.)). Also in the German toast auf ihre Gesundheit "to your health." God bless you after someone sneezes is credited to St. Gregory the Great, but the pagan Romans (Absit omen) and Greeks had similar customs.

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spa (n.)
"medicinal or mineral spring," 1620s, from the name of the health resort in eastern Belgium, known since 14c., that features mineral springs believed to have curative properties. The place name is from Walloon espa "spring, fountain." As "commercial establishment offering health and beauty treatments," 1960.
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