Etymology
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head-butt (n.)
also headbutt, 1935, from head (n.) + butt (n.5). As a verb, by 1946. Related: Head-butting (1917 as a noun).
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head shop (n.)
emporium for stoner gear, by 1969 (noted in 1966 as the name of a specific shop in New York City selling psychedelic stuff), from head (n.) in the drug sense.
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hop-head (n.)
also hophead, "opium addict," 1911, from hop (n.2) + head (n.) in the drug sense.
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raw-head (n.)
also rawhead, name of a nursery specter or "scare-child" (usually coupled with bloody-bones), early 16c., from raw (adj.) + head (n.).
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ass-head (n.)
also asshead, "stupid person, dullard," late 15c., asse hede, from ass (n.1) + head (n.). Related: Ass-headed.
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spear-head (n.)
c. 1400, from spear (n.1) + head (n.). Figurative sense of "leading element" (of an attack, movement, etc.) is attested from 1893; the verb in this sense is recorded from 1938. Related: Spearheaded; spearheading.
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arrow-head (n.)

also arrowhead, "the head of an arrow," late 15c., from arrow + head (n.). Ancient ones dug up were called elf-arrows (17c.).

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mast-head (n.)

also masthead, 1748, "top of a ship's mast" (the place for the display of flags), hence, from 1838, "top of a newspaper" (where its name, etc. appears; the nameplate itself is commonly the flag), from mast (n.1) + head (n.).

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head-hunter (n.)

also headhunter, 1800, "a savage who raids for the purpose of procuring human heads as trophies or for use in religious ceremonies," from head (n.) + hunter. Extended sense "person who finds and recruits desirable workers employed elsewhere to fill job positions" is suggested or in occasional use from 1918, frequent from 1961. Related: Head-hunting (1817).

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shit-head (n.)

also shithead, "objectionable or contemptible person," by 1961, from shit (n.) + head (n.). Piece of shit for "contemptible person" is by 1916; shit-sack or shitsack in this sense is noted by 1769, in reference to the time of Charles II, as an "opprobrious appellation by which the Nonconformists were vulgarly distinguished." Simple shit (n.) for "obnoxious person" is by 1510s.

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