Etymology
Advertisement
faultless (adj.)
mid-14c., "having no blemishes or imperfections," from fault (n.) + -less. Meaning "having no blame, culpability, or guilt" is from 1570s. Related: Faultlessly; faultlessness.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pigeon-toed (adj.)

1788, colloquially, originally of horses, by 1801 of persons, "having the toes curled in;" see pigeon. Of birds, "having the foot structure which characterizes the pigeon," by 1890.

Related entries & more 
bellied (adj.)
having a swelling or hollow middle, late 15c., from belly (n.). From 1590s as "puffed out." Also, since 16c., in compounds, "having a belly" (of a certain kind).
Related entries & more 
short-handed (adj.)

also shorthanded, "having too few 'hands,' not having the necessary number of workers or assistants," 1794, from short (adj.) + -handed. The ice hockey sense is attested from 1939.

Related entries & more 
quadrangular (adj.)

"four-cornered, four-sided," early 15c., quadrangulere, from Medieval Latin quadrangularis "having four corners," from Late Latin quadrangulus "having four angles" (see quadrangle). Related: Quadrangularly.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dentate (adj.)

"toothed, having tooth-like projections, notched," 1770, from Latin dentatus "toothed, having teeth," from dens (genitive dentis) "tooth," from PIE root *dent- "tooth." Related: Dentation (1802).

Related entries & more 
-spirited 
"having a spirit (of a specified type)," from spirit (n.).
Related entries & more 
nudibranch (n.)

type of mollusk having naked gills and no shell, 1844, literally "having naked gills," from nudi- "naked" + Latin branchae, from Greek brankhia "gills," plural of brankhion "fin." 

Related entries & more 
homonymous (adj.)
1620s, in various senses, from Latin homonymus "having the same name," from Greek homonymos "having the same name" (see homonym). Homonymy "quality of being homonymous" is from 1590s. Related: Homonymously.
Related entries & more 
effectual (adj.)
"producing an effect; having power to produce an effect," late 14c., Old French effectuel, from Late Latin effectualis, from Latin effectus "accomplishment, performance" (see effect (n.)). Used properly of actions (not agents) and with a sense "having the effect aimed at" (effective, by contrast, is used of the agent or the thing done and with a sense "having great effect"). Related: Effectually; effectualness.
Related entries & more 

Page 2