Etymology
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master-mind (n.)

1720, "an outstanding intellect," from master (n.) + mind (n.). Meaning "head of a criminal enterprise" is attested by 1872. As a verb (also mastermind), "to engage in the highest level of planning and execution of a major operation," from 1940. Related: Masterminded; masterminding.

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mind-boggling (adj.)

"that causes the mind to be overwhelmed," by 1964; see mind (n.) + present participle of boggle (v.).

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mind-reader (n.)

"one who professes to discern what is in another's mind," by 1862, from mind (n.) + read (v.). Related: Mind-reading (n.), which is attested by 1869. The older word was clairvoyance.

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stand-in (n.)

"one who substitutes for another," 1928, from the verbal phrase, attested from 1904 in show business slang in the sense "to substitute, to fill the place of another," from stand (v.) + in (adv.).

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in vivo 

1898, Latin; "within a living organism," from vivere "to live" (see vital).

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in-migration (n.)

1942, American English, in reference to movement within the same country (as distinguished from immigration), from in (prep.) + migration.

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in extremis 

"at the point of death," 16c., Latin, literally "in the farthest reaches," from ablative plural of extremus "extreme" (see extreme (adj.)).

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log in (v.)

verbal phrase, 1963 in the computing sense, from log (v.2) + in (adv.).

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all-in (adj.)

"without restrictions," 1890, from the adverbial phrase; see all + in (adv.).

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sit-in (n.)

"act of sitting in," 1937, from the verbal phrase, "take part, have a place" as a player in a game (1590s); see sit (v.) + in (adv.). The verbal phrase is attested by 1936 in reference to session musicians, "join in" with a band or orchestra. As "occupy a building," it is attested by 1937 in reference to union action, by 1941 in reference to student protests. To sit in is attested from 1868 in the sense of "attend, be present," and from 1919 specifically as "attend as an observer."

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