Etymology
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attunement (n.)
"a bringing into harmony," 1820, from attune + -ment.
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keeping (n.)
"care, custody, charge," c. 1300, verbal noun from keep (v.). Phrase in keeping with "in harmony or agreement with" (1806) is from use of keeping in the jargon of painting to refer to a pleasing harmony of the elements of a picture (1715).
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concentual (adj.)

"harmonious," 1785, from stem of Latin concentus "harmony" (see concent) + -al (1). Related: Concentually.

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accordance (n.)
c. 1300, "compliance;" early 14c., "agreement, concurrence, state of being in accord," from Old French acordance "agreeing, reconciliation, harmony," noun of action from acorder "reconcile, agree, be in harmony" (see accord (v.)). Of things, "conformity, compatibility, harmony," late 14c. Meaning "formal adjustment of a difference, peace treaty" is from late 13c. Phrase in accordance with is attested by 1793 (in Middle English, in accordance of was the usual form).
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accord (n.)
Origin and meaning of accord
late 13c., "agreement, harmony of opinions," accourd, acord, from Old French acorde, acort "agreement, alliance," a back-formation from acorder "reconcile, agree, be in harmony" (see accord (v.)). Meaning "will, voluntary impulse or act" (as in of one's own accord) is from mid-15c.
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Melpomene 

Muse of tragedy, originally of song and musical harmony, from Latin, from Greek Melpomene, literally "songstress," from melpein "to sing, to celebrate with song and dance," a word of unknown origin.

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accord (v.)
Origin and meaning of accord
early 12c., "come into agreement," also "agree, be in harmony," from Old French acorder "agree, be in harmony" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *accordare "make agree," literally "be of one heart, bring heart to heart," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + cor (genitive cordis) "heart" (used figuratively for "soul, mind"), from PIE root *kerd- "heart." Compare concord, discord. Related: Accorded; according.
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symphony (n.)

c. 1300, a name given to various types of musical instruments, from Old French simphonie, sifonie, simfone "musical harmony; stringed instrument" (12c., Modern French symphonie) and directly from Latin symphonia "a unison of sounds, harmony," from Greek symphonia "harmony, concord of sounds," from symphonos "harmonious, agreeing in sound," from assimilated form of syn- "together" (see syn-) + phōnē "voice, sound," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say."

Meaning "harmony of sounds" in English is attested from late 14c.; sense of "music in parts" is from 1590s. "It was only after the advent of Haydn that this word began to mean a sonata for full orchestra. Before that time it meant a prelude, postlude, or interlude, or any short instrumental work." ["Elson's Music Dictionary"] Meaning "elaborate orchestral composition" first attested 1789. Elliptical for "symphony orchestra" from 1926. Diminutive symphonette is recorded from 1947.

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compatible (adj.)

"capable of coexisting in harmony, reconcilable," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin compatibilis, from Late Latin compati (see compassion). Related: Compatibly; compatibility.

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attune (v.)
"put in tune, adjust to harmony of sound," also figurative, 1590s, from tune (v.), "probably suggested by ATONE" [OED]. Related: Attuned; attuning.
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