Etymology
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merriment (n.)

1570s, "comedic or mirthful entertainment," from from obsolete verb merry "be happy; make happy" (Old English myrgan; see merry (adj.)) + -ment. General sense of "state of being merry, mirth" is from 1580s.

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felicitate (v.)
1620s, "to render happy" (obsolete); 1630s, "to reckon happy;" from Late Latin felicitatus, past participle of felicitare "to make happy," from Latin felicitas "fruitfulness, happiness," from felix "fruitful, fertile; lucky, happy" (see felicity). Meaning "congratulate, compliment upon a happy event" is from 1630s. Related: Felicitated; felicitating. Little-used alternative verb form felicify (1680s) yielded adjective felicific (1865).
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beatify (v.)

1530s, "to make very happy," from French béatifer, from Late Latin beatificare "make happy, make blessed," from Latin beatus "supremely happy, blessed" (past participle of beare "make happy, bless;" see Beatrice) + -ficare, combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). The Roman Catholic Church sense of "to pronounce as being in heavenly bliss" (1620s) is the first step toward canonization. Related: Beatified; beatifying.

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Asher 
masc. proper name, biblical son of Jacob (also the name of a tribe descended from him), from Hebrew, literally "happy."
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Larry 
masc. proper name, often a familiar form of Lawrence. Expression happy as Larry attested from 1887, of unknown signification.
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Felicia 
fem. proper name, from Latin felix (genitive felicis) "happy" (see felicity).
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tickled (adj.)
"pleased, happy," 1580s, past-participle adjective from tickle (v.). To be tickled pink is from 1909.
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Felix 
masc. proper name, from Latin felix "happy" (see felicity).
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beatific (adj.)
"blissful, imparting bliss," 1630s, from French béatifique or directly from Late Latin beatificus, from Latin beatus "blessed, happy," past participle of beare "make happy, bless" (see Beatrice) + -ficus "making doing," from combining form of facere "to do, to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Beatifical (c. 1600); beatifically.
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Elysian (adj.)
1570s, "pertaining to Elysium (q.v.), the abode of the blessed after death." Hence, "exquisitely happy, full of the highest bliss."
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