Etymology
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hand job (n.)
1940s, from hand (n.) + job (n.) "piece of work."
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hand-made (adj.)
also handmade, 1610s, from hand (n.) + made. Old English had handworht "hand-wrought."
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hand-out (n.)
also handout, hand out, 1882, "alms or food given to a beggar," hobo slang, from the verbal phrase; see hand (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "distributed printed informational matter" is from 1927.
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farm-hand (n.)
also farmhand, "hired laborer on a farm," by 1835, from farm (n.) + hand (n.) in the "hired workman" sense.
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hand-me-down (adj.)
1826, from the verbal phrase; see hand (v.). As a noun from 1874.
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deck-hand (n.)

"person regularly employed as a laborer on the deck of a vessel," 1839, American English, from deck (n.) in the nautical sense + hand (n.) "manual worker."

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hand-written (adj.)
also handwritten, 1745, from hand (n.) + past participle of write (v.). As a verb, hand-write is recorded from 1878, probably a back-formation.
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second-hand (adj.)

also secondhand, "received from another or previous owner or user," 1650s, especially of clothes, "not new, having been worn," from the adverbial phrase at second hand "from a previous owner," attested by 1580s, perhaps mid-15c. See second (adj.) + hand (n.). Related: Second-handedness.

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off-hand (adv.)

also offhand, 1690s, "at once, straightway," from off (prep.) + hand (n.). Probably originally in reference to shooting "from the hand," without a rest or support. Hence, of speech or action, "without deliberation, unpremeditated" (1719). Related: Off-handed; off-handedly.

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