Etymology
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gunning (n.)

1560s, "science of firing guns;" 1620s, "shooting," verbal noun from gun (v.).

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gunplay (n.)

also gun-play, 1891, from gun (n.) + play (n.).

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gunfight (n.)

also gun-fight, a combat with handguns, 1889, American English, from gun (n.) + fight (n.). Related: Gunfighter.

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gunshot (n.)

also gun-shot, early 15c., "the firing of a gun," from gun (n.) + shot (n.). Meaning "range of a gun or cannon" is from 1530s.

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gunsmith (n.)

1580s, from gun (n.) + smith (n.). Middle English had gun-maker (late 14c.).

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gunnery (n.)

c. 1600, "science of gun-making," from gun + -ery. Meaning "science of firing guns" is from 1816.

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gunman (n.)

1620s, from gun (n.) + man (n.). In early American English use, especially of Indian warriors.

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gunner (n.)

mid-14c., gonner "one who works a cannon, catapult, or mangonel," from gun (n.) + -er (1).

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handgun (n.)

mid-14c., of unmounted firearms, from hand (n.) + gun (n.). In modern use, "a pistol," from 1930s, American English.

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gunboat (n.)

also gun-boat, "small boat fitted with guns for service inshore or up rivers," 1793, from gun (n.) + boat (n.). Gunboat diplomacy is from 1916, originally with reference to Western policies in China.

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