Etymology
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psychopomp (n.)

"guide or conductor of spirits or souls to the other world," 1835, from Greek psykhopompos "spirit-guide," a term applied to Charon, Hermes Trismegistos, Apollo, etc.; from psykhē "the soul, mind, spirit" (see psyche) + pompos "guide, conductor, escort, messenger," from pempein "to send, dispatch, guide, accompany," which is of unknown origin. "The verb has no IE etymology, nor does it show characteristics of loanwords or Pre-Greek vocabulary" [Beekes].

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Phi Beta Kappa 

undergraduate honorary society, 1776, from initials of Greek philosophia biou kybernētēs "philosophy, guide of life."

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shepherd (v.)
1790, "to herd sheep," from shepherd (n.). The metaphoric sense of "watch over or guide" is first recorded 1820. Related: Shepherded; shepherding.
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director (n.)

late 15c., "a guide," from Anglo-French directour, French directeur, agent noun from Latin dirigere "set straight, arrange; give a particular direction to," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + regere "to direct, to guide, keep straight" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line").

Corporate sense of "one of a number of persons having authority to manage the affairs of a company" is from 1630s; theatrical sense of "the leader of a company of performers" is from 1911.

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con (v.1)

"to guide a ship, give orders for the steering of a ship," 1620s, from French conduire "to conduct, lead, guide" (10c.), from Latin conducere  "to lead or bring together, contribute, serve," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). As a noun, "action or post of steering a ship," 1825. Related: Conned; conning. Conning tower "dome-shaped pilot house of an ironclad warship or submarine" is attested from 1865.

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mender (n.)

"one who or that which repairs or mends," late 14c., agent noun from mend (v.). Originally especially "one who corrects what is wrong, a moral guide."

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cicerone (n.)

"a local guide to antiquities and curiosities in Italy," 1726, from Italian cicerone, from Latin Ciceronem, from the name of the great Roman orator (see Ciceronian). Traditionally the local guides were so called in reference to their florid loquacity.

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govern (v.)
late 13c., "to rule with authority," from Old French governer "steer, be at the helm of; govern, rule, command, direct" (11c., Modern French gouverner), from Latin gubernare "to direct, rule, guide, govern" (source also of Spanish gobernar, Italian governare), originally "to steer, to pilot," a nautical borrowing from Greek kybernan "to steer or pilot a ship, direct as a pilot," figuratively "to guide, govern" (the root of cybernetics). The -k- to -g- sound shift is perhaps via the medium of Etruscan. Intransitive sense from 1590s. Related: Governed; governing.
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monitor (v.)

1924, "to check for quality" (originally especially of radio signals), from monitor (n.). General sense of "observe, keep under review" is from 1944. Keats used it (1818) as "to guide." Related: Monitored; monitoring.

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escort (v.)

1708, originally military, "attend and guard on a journey or voyage; convoy as a guard, protector, or guide," from escort (n.), or from French escorter; social sense is from 1890. Related: Escorted; escorting.

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