Etymology
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non-intercourse (n.)

"a refraining from intercourse," in any sense, 1809, from non- + intercourse.

Non-Intercourse Act, an act of the United States Congress of 1809 passed in retaliation for claims made by France and Great Britain affecting the commerce of the United States, and particularly the personal rights of United States seamen, continued 1809 and 1810, and against Great Britain 1811. It prohibited the entry of merchant vessels belonging to those countries into the ports of the United States, and the importation of goods grown or manufactured in those countries. [Century Dictionary]
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D.A.R. 

initialism for Daughters of the American Revolution, a non-profit patriotic service organization founded in 1890 for women directly descended from someone involved in the war of independence by the American colonies of Great Britain.

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historiaster (n.)
"petty or contemptible historian," 1887, from historian with ending altered to -aster. Coined by W.E. Gladstone, in a review of J. Dunbar Ingram's "History of the Legislative Union of Great Britain and Ireland."
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Victorian (adj.)
1839, "belonging to or typical of the reign of Queen Victoria of Great Britain" (ruled 1837-1901). Figurative sense of "typified by prudish or outdated attitudes" is attested by 1934. The noun meaning "a person from or typical of Victorian times" is from 1876.
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cornfield (n.)

also corn-field, "field where corn is grown," late 13c. as a surname, from corn (n.1) + field (n.). In Great Britain a field in which any kind of grain is growing; in U.S. restricted to a field of Indian corn.

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quintillion (n.)
1670s, from Latin quintus "the fifth" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + ending from million. Compare billion. In Great Britain, the fifth power of a million (1 followed by 30 zeroes); in U.S. the sixth power of a thousand (1 followed by 18 zeroes).
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tarmac (n.)
1903, Tarmac, a trademark name, short for tarmacadam (1882) "pavement created by spraying tar over crushed stone," from tar (n.1) + John L. McAdam (see macadam). By 1919, tarmac was being used generally in Great Britain for "runway."
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trillion 
1680s, from French trillion, from Italian trilione; see tri- + million. In the U.S., the fourth power of a thousand (one thousand billion, 1 followed by 12 zeroes); in Great Britain, the third power of a million (one million billion, 1 followed by 18 zeroes), which is the original sense. Compare billion.
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pendragon (n.)

"Welsh warlord" (mainly known now via Arthurian romances as the title of Uther Pendragon), late 15c., title of a chief leader in war of ancient Britain or Wales, who were invested with dictatorial powers in times of great danger, from pen "head" (see pen-) + dragon, which figured on the standard of a cohort.

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revised (adj.)

past-participle adjective from revise (v.). Revised Version of the Bible was done 1870-84 in Great Britain by more than 50 scholars from various denominations; so called because it was a revision of the 1611 ("King James") translation, also known as the Authorized Version. More accurate, less lovely.

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