Etymology
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Sellotape (n.)
1949, proprietary name, Great Britain.
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Britisher (n.)
"native or inhabitant of Great Britain," 1829, from British + -er (1).
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British (adj.)
Old English Bryttisc "of or relating to (ancient) Britons," from Bryttas "natives of ancient Britain" (see Briton). Meaning "of or pertaining to Great Britain" is from c. 1600; the noun meaning "inhabitants of Great Britain" is from 1640s. British Empire is from c. 1600. First modern record of British Isles is from 1620s. British English as the form of the English language spoken in Britain is by 1862 (George P. Marsh). Related: Britishness.
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Queensland 

Australian state, founded 1859 and named for Queen Victoria of Great Britain. Related: Queenslander.

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War of 1812 
In reference to the conflict between the U.S. and Great Britain, so called in U.S. by 1815.
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hegemon (n.)

1897, originally with reference to the position of Great Britain in the world, from Greek hēgemon "an authority, leader, sovereign" (see hegemony).

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Brittany (n.)
c. 1200, Brutaine, Britaine, from Old French Bretaigne, named for 5c. Romano-Celtic refugees from the Anglo-Saxon invasion of Britain who crossed the channel and settled there (see Britain). The Little Britain or Less Britain (lasse brutaine, c. 1300) of old, contrasted with the Great Britain. As a name for girls (with various spellings), almost unknown in U.S. before 1970, then a top-10 name for babies born between 1986 and 1995. The Brittany spaniel dog breed is attested by 1929.
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Queensberry Rules 
drawn up 1867 by Sir John Sholto Douglas (1844-1900), 8th Marquis of Queensberry, to govern the sport of boxing in Great Britain.
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prime minister 

"leading minister of a government, the chief of the cabinet or ministry," 1640s, see prime (adj.) and minister (n.). Applied to the First Minister of State of Great Britain since 1694.

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non-intercourse (n.)

"a refraining from intercourse," in any sense, 1809, from non- + intercourse.

Non-Intercourse Act, an act of the United States Congress of 1809 passed in retaliation for claims made by France and Great Britain affecting the commerce of the United States, and particularly the personal rights of United States seamen, continued 1809 and 1810, and against Great Britain 1811. It prohibited the entry of merchant vessels belonging to those countries into the ports of the United States, and the importation of goods grown or manufactured in those countries. [Century Dictionary]
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