Etymology
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he-he 

imitative of laughter, Old English.

Ha ha and he he getacniað hlehter on leden and on englisc. [Ælfric, "Grammar," c. 1000]
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frosh (n.)
student colloquial shortening and alteration of freshman, attested from 1908, "perh. under influence of German frosch frog, (dial.) grammar-school pupil" [OED].
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attributive (adj.)
c. 1600, from French attributif, from stem of Latin attributus (see attribute (v.)). As a noun in grammar, "a word expressing an attribute," from 1750. Related: Attributively; attributiveness.
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modal (adj.)

"pertaining to or affected by a mode," 1560s, originally a term in logic, from French modal and directly from Medieval Latin modalis "of or pertaining to a mode," from Latin modus "measure, extent, quantity; proper measure, rhythm, song; a way, manner, fashion, style" (in Late Latin also "mood" in grammar and logic), from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Musical sense is from 1590s; In grammar from 1798.

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expletive (adj.)
mid-15c., in grammar, "correlative," from Latin expletivus "serving to fill out" (see expletive (n.)).
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positive (n.)

1520s, originally in grammar, from positive (adj.). Sense of "that which can be affirmed, reality" is from 1610s. Sense in photography (opposite of negative (n.)) is by 1853.

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formative (adj.)

late 15c., from French formatif, from Latin format-, past-participle stem of formare "to form," from forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)). As a noun, in grammar, from 1816.

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deixis (n.)

"indication, pointing out," 1949, in grammar, from Greek deixis "reference," from deiknynai "to show" (from PIE root *deik- "to show"). Related: Deictic.

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injunctive 
1620s, from Latin iniunct-, past participle stem of iniungere "impose; attach to" (see injunction) + -ive. As a term in grammar, from 1910.
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privative (adj.)

late 14c., privatif, "characterized by absence of a quality, characterized by taking away or removal of something," from Latin privativus "denoting privation," in grammar, "negative," from privatus, past participle of privare "to deprive, rob, strip" of anything; "to deliver from" anything" (see private (adj.)).

In grammar, from 1580s as "expressing negation, changing the sense of a word from positive to negative" (as do the prefixes un-, an- (1), in- (1), a- (3), etc.). Related: Privatively.

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