Etymology
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garner (n.)
"a granary," late 12c., gerner, from Old French gernier, metathesized variant of grenier "storehouse, loft for grain," from Latin granarium (usually plural, granaria) "store-house for grain," from granum "grain," from PIE root *gre-no- "grain."
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granular (adj.)
1790, from Late Latin granulum "granule, a little grain," diminutive of Latin granum "grain, seed" (from PIE root *gre-no- "grain") + -ar. Replaced granulous (late 14c.). Related: Granularity.
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cereal (n.)

1832, "grass yielding edible grain and cultivated for food," originally an adjective (1818) "having to do with edible grain," from French céréale (16c., "of Ceres;" 18c. in grain sense), from Latin Cerealis "of grain," originally "of Ceres," from Ceres, Italic goddess of agriculture, from PIE *ker-es-, from root *ker- (2) "to grow." The application to breakfast food cereal made from grain is American English, 1899.

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fingering (n.2)
"thick, loose woolen yarn," 1680s, from fingram, from French fin grain, literally "fine grain."
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skep (n.)
quantity measure for grain, etc.; basket, grain receptacle, c. 1100, from Old Norse skeppa "basket, bushel." Related: Skepful.
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spike (n.2)
"ear of grain," c. 1300, from Latin spica "ear of grain," from PIE *spei-ko-, from suffixed form of root *spei- "sharp point" (see spine).
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frumentaceous (adj.)
1660s, from Late Latin frumentaceus "of grain," from frumentum "grain, corn," related to frui "to use, enjoy" (from PIE root *bhrug- "to enjoy"). Hence also frumenty "potage of boiled hulled grain mixed with milk and sweetened" (late 14c.), from Old French frumentee, Medieval Latin frumenticium.
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Spica (n.)
1728, bright star in constellation Virgo, from Latin, literally "ear of grain" (see spike (n.2)); corresponding to Greek stakhys. As the ancients visualized the constellation, she held an ear of grain.
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spigot (n.)
late 14c., "plug used to stop the hole of a cask," according to Barnhart probably from Old French *espigot (compare Gascony dialect espigot "core of a fruit, small ear of grain"), diminutive of Old Provençal espiga "ear of grain," from Latin spica "ear of grain" (see spike (n.2)). Meaning "valve for controlling the flow of a liquid" is from 1520s; the connecting notion is "that which controls or restrains."
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kernel (n.)
"edible substance in a nut or the stone of a fruit," Old English cyrnel "seed, kernel, pip," from Proto-Germanic *kurnilo- (source also of Middle High German kornel "a grain," Middle Dutch cornel "coarse meal"), from the root of corn "seed, grain" (from PIE root *gre-no- "grain") + -el, diminutive suffix. Figurative sense of "core or central part of anything" is from 1550s.
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