Etymology
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shank (v.)

in golf, "to strike (the ball) with the heel of the club," by 1927, from shank (n.). Related: Shanked; shanking. Earlier as "to take to one's legs" (1774, Scottish); "to send off without ceremony" (1816, also Scottish).

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mashie (n.)

in golf, "straight-faced niblick," (Linskill's "Golf," 1889, calls it "a cross between a niblick and a lofting-iron"), historical version of a modern five iron, 1881, mashy, from Scottish, probably named for a mason's hammer, from French massue "club," from Vulgar Latin *mattiuca, from Latin mateola "a tool for digging" (see mace (n.1)). Related: Mashie-niblick (1903).

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putter (n.)

late 14c., "beast that pushes with the head;" early 15c., "one who puts or places," agent noun from put (v.). Meaning "one who throws (a stone or other heavy weight)" is by 1820. As a type of golf club with a stiff and comparatively short staff, used when the ball lies a short distance from the hole, by 1743; see putt (v.).

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nightclub (n.)

also night-club, "club open at night," 1894, from night + club (n.) in the social sense.

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driver (n.)

"one who or that which drives" in various senses, late 14c. (late 13c. as a surname); agent noun from drive (v.). Earliest sense is "herdsman, drover, one who drives livestock." From mid-15c. as "one who drives a vehicle." In U.S., "overseer of a gang of slaves," by 1796. Meaning "golf club for hitting great distances" is by 1892. Driver's seat is attested by 1867; figurative use by 1954.

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clubbable (adj.)

"having qualities that make one fit to be a member of a social club," 1783, from club (n.) + -able.

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lie (n.2)

"manner of lying, relative position," 1690s, from lie (v.2). Sense in golf is from 1857.

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link (n.3)

"undulating sandy ground," especially in a golf course; see links.

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clubbed (adj.)

late 14c., "shaped like a club, thick at the end," from club (n.). Specifically of defects of the foot by c. 1500; meaning "formed into a club" is from 1620s.

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