Etymology
Advertisement
godlike (adj.)
1510s, from god + like (adj.). Absent in Middle English; Old English had godlic "godlike, divine."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
godmother (n.)
woman who sponsors one at baptism, late 13c., from God + mother (n.1); modifying or replacing Old English godmodor.
Related entries & more 
godchild (n.)
"child one sponsors at baptism," c. 1200, "in ref. to the spiritual relation assumed to exist between them" [Century Dictionary], from God + child. The Old English word was godbearn
Related entries & more 
godly (adj.)
late 14c., from god + -ly (1). Perhaps earlier, but due to identical spelling in Middle English it is difficult to distinguish from goodly. Related: Godlily.
Related entries & more 
golly (interj.)
euphemism for God, by 1775, in Gilbert White's journal; he refers to it as "a sort of jolly kind of oath, or asseveration much in use among our carters, & the lowest people."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
godfather (n.)
man who sponsors one at baptism and guarantees the child's religious education, late 12c., from God + father (n.), modifying or replacing Old English godfaeder. In the Mafia sense from 1963 in English; popularized by Mario Puzo's novel (1969) and the movie based on it (1972).
Related entries & more 
godhead (n.)
c. 1200, "divine nature, deity, divinity," from god + Middle English -hede (see -head). Along with maidenhead, the sole survival of this form of the suffix. Old English had godhad "divine nature." Parallel form godhood is from early 13c., now chiefly restricted to "state or condition of being a god."
Related entries & more 
demigod (n.)

"inferior or minor deity, a being partly of divine nature," 1520s, from demi- + god, rendering Latin semideus. It can mean the offspring of a deity and a mortal, a man raised to divine rank, or a minor god. Related: Demigoddess.

Related entries & more 
gosh (interj.)
minced oath, 1757, altered pronunciation of God. Probably via by gosse (mid-16c.). Compare losh! an 18c. interjection in certain expressions (the losh preserve me) implying surprise or deprecation, said by Century Dictionary to be "A distortion of Lord."
Related entries & more 
goddess (n.)
mid-14c., female deity in a polytheistic religion, from god + fem. suffix -esse (see -ess). The Old English word was gyden, corresponding to Dutch godin, German Göttin, Danish gudine, Swedish gudinna. Of mortal women by 1570s. Related: Goddesshood.
Related entries & more 

Page 2