Etymology
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go-between (n.)
"one who passes between parties in a negotiation or intrigue," 1590s, from verbal phrase go between in obsolete sense "act as a mediator" (1540s), from go (v.) + between.
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go-to-meeting (adj.)
"suitable for use in a church or on Sundays," 1790, especially of clothes but the earliest recorded reference is to music.
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go through (v.)
"to execute, carry to completion" (a plan, etc., often with with), 1560s; see go (v.) + through (adv.). Meaning "to examine" is 1660s; "to endure, suffer, undergo" is by 1712; "to wear out" (of clothes, etc.) by 1959.
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stop-and-go (adj.)
1926, originally a reference to traffic signals; see stop (v.), go (v.). Stop-go in same sense is from 1918.
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go out (v.)
early 13c., "leave home," from go (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "become extinct, expire" is from c. 1400.
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go-cart (n.)
also gocart, 1670s, originally "a litter, sedan chair;" also "an infant's walker" (1680s), from go + cart (n.). Later also of hand carts (1759). The modern form go-kart (1959) was coined in reference to a kind of miniature racing car with a frame body and a two-stroke engine.
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go over (v.)
1580s, "review point by point;" see go (v.) + over (adv.). Meaning "be successful" is from 1923.
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go-getter (n.)
1910, American English, from go + agent noun from get (v.). Goer, with essentially the same meaning, is attested from late 14c.
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go together (v.)
1520s, "accompany," see go (v.) + together (adv.). From 1710 as "agree with, harmonize with;" 1899 as "be courting."
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go down (v.)
c. 1300, "droop, descend," from go (v.) + down (adv.). Meaning "decline, fail" is from 1590s. Sense of "to happen" is from 1946, American-English slang. Go down on "perform oral sex on" is from 1916.
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