Etymology
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spyglass (n.)

also spy-glass, "telescope, field-glass," 1706, from spy (v.) + glass (n.). Spying-glass is from 1680s.

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glazier (n.)

"one who fits window glass into frames," early 15c. variant of late 14c. glasier (late 13c. as a surname, glasyer, from glass (v.) + -er (1). Influenced by French words in -ier. Alternative glazer recorded from c. 1400 as "one who applies coatings to earthenware."

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glaze (v.)

late 14c. variant of Middle English glasen "to fit with glass," also "to make shine," from glas (see glass (n.)). The form probably influenced or reinforced by glazier. Of pottery, etc., "cover with a shiny or glossy substance," from c. 1400. Related: Glazed; glazing.

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hourglass (n.)

also hour-glass, instrument for measuring time, 1510s, from hour + glass (n.). Used 19c. in a variety of technical and scientific senses to describe the shape; in reference to women's torsos by 1897.

Men condemn corsets in the abstract, and are sometimes brave enough to insist that the women of their households shall be emancipated from them; and yet their eyes have been so generally educated to the approval of the small waist, and the hourglass figure, that they often hinder women who seek a hygienic style of dress. [Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, "The Story of My Life," 1898]
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vitrine (n.)

"glass show-case," 1880, from French vitrine, from vitre "glass, window-glass," from Latin vitrum "glass" (see vitreous).

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hyaline (adj.)

"glassy; made of glass; transparent," 1660s, from Latin hyalinus, from Greek hyalinos "of glass or crystal," from hyalos "glass" (see hyalo-).

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vorpal (adj.)

1871, invented by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking-Glass" ("Jabberwocky").

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bell-jar (n.)

"bell-shaped glass jar," 1830, from bell (n.) + jar (n.). Especially one used by chemists. Earlier was bell-glass (1680s).

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vitreous (adj.)

early 15c., "glasslike," from Latin vitreus "of glass, glassy," from vitrum "glass," which perhaps was so called for its color (compare vitrium "woad"). Vitreous humor attested from 1660s.

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bugle (n.2)

"glass bead used to ornament dress," 1570s, of unknown origin.

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