Etymology
Advertisement
hyaline (adj.)

"glassy; made of glass; transparent," 1660s, from Latin hyalinus, from Greek hyalinos "of glass or crystal," from hyalos "glass" (see hyalo-).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
glasses (n.)

"spectacles," 1660s, from plural of glass (n.).

Related entries & more 
vitro- 

word-forming element meaning "glass," from combining form of Latin vitrum "glass" (see vitreous).

Related entries & more 
sky (v.)

"to raise or throw toward the skies," 1802, from sky (n.). By 1865 in reference to paintings hung near the ceiling in an exhibit. Related: Skyed; skyer; skying.

Related entries & more 
glassful (n.)

Old English glæsful "as much as a glass will hold;" see glass (n.) + -ful.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
in vitro 

1892, scientific Latin; "in a test tube, culture dish, etc.;" literally "in glass," from Latin vitrum "glass" (see vitreous).

Related entries & more 
soffit (n.)

architectural term referring to under-faces, 1610s, from Italian soffita, fem. of soffitto "ceiling," noun use of adjective meaning "fixed beneath," from Vulgar Latin *suffictus "fastened below," from Latin suffixus (see suffix (n.)).

Related entries & more 
vorpal (adj.)

1871, invented by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking-Glass" ("Jabberwocky").

Related entries & more 
bell-jar (n.)

"bell-shaped glass jar," 1830, from bell (n.) + jar (n.). Especially one used by chemists. Earlier was bell-glass (1680s).

Related entries & more 

Page 2