Etymology
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get-up (n.)

also getup, 1847, "equipment, costume," from get (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "initiative, energy" recorded from 1841. The verbal phrase is recorded from mid-14c. as "to rise."

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swear-word (n.)

1873, American English colloquial, from swear (v.) + word (n.).

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loan-word (n.)

"word taken untranslated from one language into another," 1860, a translation of German Lehnwort, properly "lend-word," from lehnen "lend" (see lend (v.)) + Word (see word (n.)).

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get back (v.)

c. 1600 (intransitive) "to return;" 1808 (transitive) "to recover (something);" from get (v.) + back.(adv.). Meaning "retaliate" is attested by 1888.

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get-out (n.)

also getout, figuratively indicating a high degree of something, by 1838, colloquial, from get (v.) + out (adv.). Verbal phrase get out as a command to go away is from 1711, but sense connection is not clear.

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get along (v.)

"agree, live harmoniously," 1875, from get (v.) + along (adv.).

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get-rich-quick (adj.)

in reference to projects or schemes, American English, 1891, when there was a rash of them, from the verbal phrase.

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-phage 

word-forming element meaning "eater," from stem of Greek phagein "to eat," from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share."

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mero- 

before vowels mer-, word-forming element meaning "part, partial, fraction," from Greek meros "a part, a fraction," from PIE root *(s)mer- (2) "to get a share of something."

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cognoscence (n.)

mid-15c., "heraldic mark;" 1530s, "knowledge, act or state of knowing," abstract noun from the past-participle stem of Latin cognoscere "to get to know, recognize" (see cognizance, which is now the usual word).

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