Etymology
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Weigela (n.)

shrub genus, 1846, from the name of German physician and botanist C.E. Weigel (1748-1831).

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xiphias (n.)

1660s, genus of swordfish, from Greek xiphias "swordfish," from xiphos "a sword" (see xiphoid). Related: Xiphioid.

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polygenous (adj.)

"composed of many kinds or sorts, of many kinds or families," 1797; see poly- "much, many" + genus.

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paramecium (n.)

"genus of holotrichous ciliate Infusorial" [OED]; "the slipper-animacule" [Century Dictionary]; 1752, Modern Latin Paramecium, the genus name, coined from Greek paramekes "oblong, oval," from para- "on one side" (see para- (1)) + mēkos "length," related to makros "long," from PIE root *mak- "long, thin."

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Sabal (n.)

a genus of fan-palms of tropical Americas, 1763, said to be from a South American or Mexican name.

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sedum (n.)

mid-15c. as the name of a type of plant, from Latin sedum "houseleek." As a genus name, late 18c.

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Rana 

frog genus, Modern Latin, from Latin rana "frog," which probably is imitative of croaking (compare frog (n.1)).

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salvia (n.)

genus name of a large and diverse group of plants including the garden sage, 1844, from Latin salvia "the plant sage" (see sage (n.1)).

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capsicum (n.)

name given to the genus of pepper plants, a word of unknown origin. Perhaps it is irregularly formed from Latin capsa "box" (see case (n.2)) based on the shape of the fruit. It was adopted as a genus name through the writings of French botanist Joseph Pitton de Tournefort (1656-1708), but he did not explain the word. 

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hosta (n.)

1828, plant genus of the lily family, coined 1812 in Modern Latin from name of Austrian physician and botanist Nicolaus Thomas Host (1761-1834).

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