Etymology
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procreation (n.)

late 14c., procreacioun, "process of begetting offspring, generation and production of young," from Old French procreacion (14c., Modern French prócreation) and directly from Latin procreationem (nominative procreatio) "a begetting, generation," noun of action from past-participle stem of procreare "bring forth" (offspring), "beget, generate, produce," from pro "forth" (see pro-) + creare "create" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow"). Spelling with -t- in English begins mid-15c.

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heirloom (n.)
early 15c., ayre lome, a hybrid from heir + loom (n.) in its original but now otherwise obsolete sense of "implement, tool," extended to mean "article." Technically, some piece of property that by will or custom passes down with the real estate. General sense of "anything handed down from generation to generation" is from 1610s.
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neuter (v.)

"castrate, render (a male) incapable of generation," 1893, in reference to dogs, from neuter (adj.). Related: Neutered; neutering.

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abiogenesis (n.)
"spontaneous generation" (of life, without parent organisms), 1870, coined in Modern Latin by T.H. Huxley, from a- (3) + biogenesis.
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photovoltaic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the generation of an electric current at the junction of two substances exposed to light," 1923, from photo- + voltaic. Related: Photovoltaics (see -ics).

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genital (adj.)
late 14c., "pertaining to (sexual) reproduction," in membres genytal "the genitals," from Latin genitalis "pertaining to generation or birth; fruitful" (also a by-name of the goddess Diana), from genitus, past participle of gignere "to beget" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). Hence the English word came to mean "pertaining to the organs of generation." As a noun meaning "sex organ" from mid-15c. (plural genitals is from late 14c.).
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nisei (n.)

"American born of Japanese parents," from Japanese ni- "second" + sei "generation." Use of the word was limited to U.S. West Coast until c. 1942.

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beat (adj.)
"defeated, overcome by effort," c. 1400, from past tense of beat (v.). Meaning "tired, exhausted by exertion," is by 1905, American English. For beat generation see beatnik.
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Cronus 

from Latinized form of Greek Kronos, youngest of the first generation of Titans, and their leader; a name of uncertain origin but probably not related to Khronos, personification of time, except in folk-etymology.

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borg (n.)
fictional hostile alien hive-race in the "Star Trek" series, noted for "assimilating" defeated rivals, first introduced in "The Next Generation" TV series (debut fall 1987). Their catchphrase is "resistance is futile." According to the series creators, the name is derived from cyborg.
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