Etymology
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hiatus (n.)

1560s, "break or opening" in a material object, especially in anatomy, from Latin hiatus "opening, aperture, rupture, gap," from past participle stem of hiare "to gape, stand open," from PIE root *ghieh- "to yawn, gape, be wide open." Sense of "gap or interruption in events, etc.;" "space from which something requisite to completeness is absent" [Century Dictionary] is recorded from 1610s.

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regender (v.)

also re-gender, c. 1400, "beget again, make or create afresh," a sense identified in OED as obsolete, from re- "back, again" + gender (v.) "bring forth, give birth." Related: Regendered; regendering.

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masculine (adj.)

mid-14c., "belonging to the male grammatical gender;" late 14c., "of men, of male sex," from Old French masculin "of the male sex" (12c.), from Latin masculinus "male, of masculine gender," from masculus "male, masculine; worthy of a man," diminutive of mas (genitive maris) "male person, male," a word of unknown origin. The diminutive form might be by pairing association with femininus (see feminine). Meaning "having the appropriate qualities of the male sex, physically or mentally: Manly, virile, powerful" is attested by 1620s. As a noun, "masculine gender," from c. 1500.

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void (n.)
1610s, "unfilled space, gap," from void (adj.). Meaning "absolute empty space, vacuum" is from 1727.
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unsex (v.)
"deprive of the qualities considered typical of one's gender," c. 1600, from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + sex (n.). Related: Unsexed; unsexing.
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pleat (n.)

"a fold," 1580s, variant of plait (n.). With a gap in the printed record 17c.-18c., but according to OED probably it was in continuous oral use. Compare the verb.

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credibility (n.)

"quality of being credible, capacity or condition of being believed, just claim to credit," 1590s, from Medieval Latin credibilitas, from Latin credibilis (see credible). Credibility gap is 1966, American English, in reference to official statements about the Vietnam War.

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neuter (adj.)

late 14c., neutre, in grammar, of nouns, pronouns, etc., "neither masculine nor feminine in gender," also of verbs, "having middle or reflexive meaning, neither active nor passive," from Latin neuter "of the neuter gender," literally "neither one nor the other," from ne- "not, no" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + uter "either (of two)" (see whether). The Latin word is probably a loan-translation of Greek oudeteros "neither, neuter." From 1520s it also had the sense of "taking neither side" which now generally goes with neutral (adj.).

As a noun from mid-15c., "the neuter gender;" by 1797 of certain animals (among bees, ants, etc.) that are of neither sex and incapable of generation.

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drowse (v.)

"be heavy with sleep, be half asleep," 1570s, probably a back-formation from drowsy. Old English had a similar word, but there is a 600-year gap. Related: Drowsed; drowsing.The noun meaning "state of being half asleep" is by 1814.

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omnisexual (adj.)

"pansexual; sexually, romantically, or emotionally attracted to people regardless of their sex or gender," by 1959, from omni- "all, every" + sexual. Earliest application is to Walt Whitman.

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