Etymology
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lucrative (adj.)

"yielding gain, highly profitable," early 15c., from Old French lucratif "profitable" and directly from Latin lucrativus "gainful, profitable," from lucratus, past participle of lucrari "to gain, win, acquire," from lucrum "gain, profit" (see lucre). Related: Lucratively; lucrativeness.

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acquire (v.)
"to get or gain, obtain," mid-15c., acqueren, from Old French aquerre "acquire, gain, earn, procure" (12c., Modern French acquérir), from Vulgar Latin *acquaerere, corresponding to Latin acquirere/adquirere "to get in addition to, accumulate, gain," from ad "to," here perhaps emphatic (see ad-), + quaerere "to seek to obtain" (see query (v.)). Reborrowed in current form from Latin c. 1600. Related: Acquired; acquiring.
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win (v.)

"be victorious," c. 1300 fusion of Old English winnan "to labor, toil, struggle for, work at, strive, fight," and gewinnan "to gain or succeed by struggling, conquer, obtain," both from Proto-Germanic *wennanan "to seek to gain" (source also of Old Saxon winnan, Old Norse vinna, Old Frisian winna, Dutch winnen "to gain, win," Danish vinde "to win," Old High German winnan "to strive, struggle, fight," German gewinnen "to gain, win," Gothic gawinnen "to suffer, toil"), from PIE root *wen- (1) "to desire, strive for."

Related: Won; winning. Meaning "gain the affection or esteem of" is from c. 1600. Breadwinner preserves the sense of "toil" in Old English winnan. Phrase you can't win them all (1954) first attested in Raymond Chandler. Winningest is attested by 1804.

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emolument (n.)

mid-15c., "the profit arising from office or employment, that which is given as compensation for services," from Old French émolument "advantage, gain, benefit; income, revenue" (13c.) and directly from Latin emolumentum "profit, gain, advantage, benefit," perhaps originally "payment to a miller for grinding corn," from emolere "grind out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + molere "to grind" (from PIE root *mele- "to crush, grind"). Formerly also "profit, advantage, gain in general, that which promotes the good of any person or thing" (1630s).

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net (v.2)

"to gain as a net sum, produce as clear profit," 1758, from net (adj.). Related: Netted; netting.

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profitless (adj.)

"void of profit, gain, or advantage," 1590s, from profit (n.) + -less.

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lucre (n.)

"gain in money or goods, profit," late 14c., from Old French lucre, from Latin lucrum "material gain, advantage, profit; wealth, riches," of uncertain origin. De Vaan says from Proto-Italic *lukro-, from PIE *lhu-tlo- "seizure, gain," with cognates in Greek apolauo "take hold of, enjoy," leia (Doric laia) "booty;" Gothic laun "reward."

Often specifically in a restricted sense of "base or unworthy gain, money or wealth as the object of greed," hence "greed." Filthy lucre (Titus i.11) is Tyndale's rendering of Greek aiskhron kerdos.

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mercenary (adj.)

"working or acting for reward, serving only for gain," hence "resulting from sordid motives, ready to accept dishonorable gain," 1530s, from mercenary (n.), or in part from Latin mercenarius "hired, paid, serving for pay."

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profit (v.)

early 14c., profilen (transitive), "to advance, benefit, gain," from profit (n.) and from Old French prufiter, porfiter "to benefit," from prufit. From mid-14c. as "be helpful or useful, do good." Intransitive sense of "gain in a material sense, derive profit or benefit" is from c. 1400. Related: Profited; profiting.

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coquette (n.)

"woman who endeavors to gain the admiration of men, a flirt," 1660s, from French fem. of coquet (male) "flirt" (see coquet, which was used of women from 1610s).

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