Etymology
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catsuit (n.)

also cat-suit, "tight-fitting full-body garment," 1960, from cat (n.) + suit (n.). Perhaps so called because suitable for slinking.

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unsuited (adj.)
"unfit," 1590s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of suit (v.).
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misbecome (v.)

"suit ill, be unfitting," 1520s, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + become.

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frogman (n.)
"scuba diver in rubber suit," 1945, from frog (n.1) + man (n.).
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litigate (v.)

1610s (intransitive), from Latin litigatus, past participle of litigare "to dispute, carry on a suit," from phrase litem agere "to drive a suit," from litem (nominative lis) "lawsuit, dispute, quarrel, strife" (which is of uncertain origin) + agere "to set in motion, drive forward" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). Transitive sense is from 1741. Related: Litigated; litigating.

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befit (v.)
"suit, be suitable to," mid-15c., from be- + fit (v.). Related: Befitted; befitting.
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panoply (n.)

1570s, "complete suit of armor," from Greek panoplia "complete suit of armor," from pan- "all" (see pan-) + hopla (plural), "arms" of a hoplites ("heavily armed soldier"); see hoplite. Originally in English figurative, of "spiritual armor," etc. (a reference to Ephesians vi); non-armorial sense of "any splendid array" is by 1829. Related: Panoplied.

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tailor (v.)
1660s, from tailor (n.). Figurative sense of "to design (something) to suit needs" is attested from 1942. Related: Tailored; tailoring.
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drape (n.)

1660s, "cloth, drapery," from drape (v.). Jive talk slang for "suit of clothes" is attested from 1945. Drapes "curtains" is by 1895. 

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