Etymology
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founder (v.)
early 14c. "to send to the bottom" (transitive); late 14c., "to sink or fall" (intransitive), from Old French fondrer "collapse; submerge, sink, fall to the bottom" (Modern French fondrier), from fond "bottom" (12c.), from Latin fundus "bottom, foundation" (see fund (n.)). Not especially of ships in Middle English, where it typically meant "fall to the ground." Figurative use from 1580s. Related: Foundered; foundering.
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found (v.1)
"lay the basis of, establish," late 13c., from Old French fonder "found, establish; set, place; fashion, make" (12c.), from Latin fundare "to lay the bottom or foundation" of something, from fundus "bottom, foundation" (see fund (n.)). Related: Founded; founding. Phrase founding fathers with reference to the creators of the American republic is attested from 1916.
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profound (adj.)

c. 1300, "characterized by intellectual depth, very learned," from Old French profont, profund (12c., Modern French profond) and directly from Latin profundus "deep, bottomless, vast," also "obscure; profound; immoderate," from pro "forth" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward") + fundus "bottom" (see fund (n.)).

The literal and figurative senses both were in Latin, but English, having already deep, has employed this word primarily in its figurative sense; however in 15c. it was used of deep lakes or wounds. Sense of "deeply felt, intense" is from c. 1400. Related: Profoundly. A verb profound "to penetrate, reach inside, saturate, fill" is attested in English from 15c.-17c.

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refund (v.)

early 15c., refounden, refunden, "to pass on, transmit;" also "to return" (earlier "to pour back," late 14c.); from Old French refunder, refounder, refondre "restore" and directly from Latin refundere "give back, restore, return," literally "pour back, flow back," from re- "back" (see re-) + fundere "to pour" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour").

Century Dictionary speculates that Old French refounder in the sense "restore" was confused with refonder, refunder, "re-establish, rebuild, restore ("refound"). In some senses also influenced by fund (n.). Specifically as "to resupply with money" from 1550s. Related: Refunded; refunding.

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mutual (n.)
short for mutual fund, 1971; see mutual.
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UNICEF 
by 1948, acronym from United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, which was created in 1946 (the name was changed 1953 to United Nations Children's Fund but the acronym endured).
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amortization (n.)
1670s, in reference to the alienation of lands given to religious orders, noun of action from amortize. Of debts, "extinction (especially by a sinking-fund)," from 1824.
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pool (v.2)

"to make a common interest or fund, put things into one common fund or stock for the purpose of dividing or redistribution in certain proportions," 1871, from pool (n.2). Related: Pooled; pooling.

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Fulbright (n.)
in education, a reference to U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright (1905-1995) of Arkansas, especially to the Fulbright Act of 1946, which authorized proceeds from sales of U.S. war surplus materials to be used to fund higher education overseas.
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bursar (n.)
"treasurer of a college," 1580s, from Anglo-Latin burser "treasurer" (13c.), from Medieval Latin bursarius "purse-bearer," from bursa "bag, purse" (see purse (n.)). Also, in Scotland, "student in a college who receives an allowance from a fund for his subsistence" (1560s). Related: Bursarial.
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