Etymology
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blast-off (n.)
"initial burst of energy that launches a rocket into space," 1950, from blast (v.) + off (adv.).
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off-Broadway (adj.)

1953 in reference to experimental theater productions in New York City, from off (prep.) + Broadway. Even more experimental off-off-Broadway is attested by 1958.

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off-load (v.)

"unload, relieve oneself of," 1850, from off (adv.) + load (v.). Originally South African, on the model of Dutch afladen.

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off-peak (adj.)

"that is not at the maximum," 1906, originally in reference to electrical systems, from off- (adj.) (see off (prep.)) + peak (n.).

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show-off (n.)
1776, "a display;" see show (v.) + off (adv.). From 1801 as "a deliberate and ostentatious display;" in reference to the person who makes such a display, attested from 1924. The verbal phrase is first recorded 1793 as "make a conspicuous and obvious display." Noun showing-off is from 1874.
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one-off (n.)

"single example of a manufactured product," by 1927, from one + off. Later given figurative extension.

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hands-off (adj.)
by 1895, from verbal phrase; see hand (n.) + off (adv.). Hands off! as a command to desist is by 1810.
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off-putting (adj.)

1570s, "procrastinating," from the verbal phrase; see off (adv.) + put (v.). Meaning "creating an unfavorable impression" is attested by 1894. To put off is attested from late 14c. as "defer, postpone, delay;" 1560s as "dismiss by an evasion;" 1610s as "divert from one's purpose." As a noun, put-off in the sense of "an excuse for evasion or delay" is attested from 1540s.

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stand-off (n.)
also stand-off, 1843, "draw, tie," from the verbal phrase (c. 1600), from stand (v.) + off (adv.). Mexican stand-off "stalemate" is recorded from 1891.
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off-shore (adv., adj.)

also offshore, 1720, "in a direction away from the shore," from off (prep.) + shore (n.). As an adjective in 19c., "carried on more than three miles from shore." American English use for "other than the U.S." is from 1948 and the Marshall Plan.

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