Etymology
Advertisement
chez (prep.)

1740, from French chez "at the house of," from Old French chiese "house" (12c.), from Latin casa "house." Used with French personal names, meaning "house of _____."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
treasurer (n.)
late 13c., from Old North French, Anglo-French tresorer, Old French tresorier, from tresor (see treasure (n.)). Treasury bill attested from 1797.
Related entries & more 
demure (adj.)

late 14c. (early 14c. as an Anglo-French surname), "calm, settled;" of persons, "sober, grave, serious," from an Anglo-French extended form of Old French meur "mature, fully grown, ripe," hence "discreet" (Modern French mûr), from Latin maturus "mature" (see mature (v.)). The de- in this word is of uncertain meaning and origin. Barnhart suggests the Anglo-French word is from Old French demore, past participle of demorer "to stay," and influenced by meur. Klein suggests Old French de (bon) murs "of good manners," from murs (Modern French moeurs).

Now usually meaning "affectedly decorous, reserved, or coy" (1690s). Related: Demurely; demureness.

Related entries & more 
islet (n.)

1530s, from French islette (Modern French îlette), diminutive of isle (see isle).

Related entries & more 
surveyor (n.)
early 15c. (late 14c. as a surname), from Anglo-French surveiour "guard, overseer," Old French sorveor, from Old French verb sorveoir "to survey" (see survey (v.)).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
frivolity (n.)
1796, from French frivolité, from Old French frivole "frivolous," from Latin frivolus (see frivolous).
Related entries & more 
shallot (n.)

"small onion," 1660s, shortened from eschalot, from French échalote, from French eschalotte, from Old French eschaloigne, from Vulgar Latin *escalonia (see scallion).

Related entries & more 
beverage (n.)
"drink of any kind," mid-13c., from Anglo-French beverage, Old French bevrage, from Old French boivre "to drink" (Modern French boire; from Latin bibere "to imbibe;" from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink") + -age, suffix forming mass or abstract nouns (see -age).
Related entries & more 
gallop (v.)
"move or run by leaps," early 15c., from Old French galoper "to gallop" (12c.), central Old French form of Old North French waloper, probably from Frankish *wala hlaupan "to run well" (see wallop). Related: Galloped; galloping. Though the French word is Germanic, Dutch galopperen, German galoppiren, Swedish galoppera are from French.
Related entries & more 
joual (n.)
"colloquial Canadian French," 1959, from "joual," the colloquial Canadian French pronunciation of French cheval "horse" (see cavalier (n.)). The term was brought to attention by Quebec journalist André Laurendeau.
Related entries & more 

Page 2