Etymology
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free-born (adj.)
"inheriting liberty," mid-14c., from free (adj.) + born. Old English had freolic (adj.) "free, free-born; glorious, magnificent, noble; beautiful, charming," which became Middle English freli, "a stock epithet of compliment," but which died out, perhaps as the form merged with that of freely (adv.).
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scot-free (adj.)

late Old English scotfreo "exempt from royal tax," from scot (n.) "royal tax" + freo "free" (see free (adj.)).

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free-range (adj.)
1960, from free range (n.) "open space available for free movement" (especially of domestic animals), 1821; see free (adj.) + range (n.). As a noun from 1912.
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free-spoken (adj.)
"accustomed to speaking without reserve," 1620s, from free (adj.) + -spoken.
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free-lance (n.)
also freelance, "medieval mercenary warrior," 1820 ("Ivanhoe"), from free (adj.) + lance (n.); apparently a coinage of Sir Walter Scott's. The description of them resembles that of the Italian condottieri. Figurative sense is from 1864; specifically of journalism by 1882.
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free-wheeling (adj.)
also freewheeling, 1903, from free wheel (1899, see free (adj.) + wheel (n.)); a bicycle wheel that turns even when not being pedaled, later from the name of a kind of automobile drive system that allowed cars to coast without being slowed by the engine. Figurative sense is from 1911.
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free-fall (n.)

also freefall, "motion of a body where gravity is the only force acting upon it," by 1906, from free (adj.) + fall (v.). Related: Free-falling (1962).

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fancy-free (adj.)
"free from the trammels of love, having the 'fancy' or affection free," 1580s, from fancy (n.) + free (adj.).
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free-hand (adv.)
of drawing, "done without guiding instruments such as engineer's curves," 1848; see free (adj.) + hand (n.).
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