Etymology
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Warfarin (n.)
1950, from WARF, acronym from Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation + -arin, from Coumarin. The organization describes itself as "an independent, nonprofit foundation chartered to support research at the U[niversity of] W[isconsin]-Madison and the designated technology transfer organization for the university."
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A.A.A. 
also AAA, abbreviation of American Automobile Association, attested 1902, American English, the year the organization was founded.
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Komsomol (n.)
Russian communist youth organization, 1925, from Russian Komsomol, contraction of Kommunisticheskii Soyuz Molodezhi "Communist Union of Youth."
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UNESCO 
acronym from United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which was created in 1945.
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NATO 
acronym of North Atlantic Treaty Organization, which was set up in 1949.
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ikebana (n.)
Japanese are of formal flower arrangement, 1901, from Japanese, from ikeru "to keep alive, arrange" + hana "flower."
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snick (n.)
1962, American English, from common pronunciation of SNCC, initialism (acronym) for "Student Non-violent Co-ordinating Committee," black civil rights organization.
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debate (n.)

early 14c., "a quarrel, dispute, disagreement" (now archaic), from Old French debat, from debatre(see debate (v.)). Sense of "contention by argument" is from late 14c., that of "a formal dispute, a debating contest, interchange of arguments in a somewhat formal manner" is perhaps from early 15c.

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Comintern (n.)

"international organization of the Communist Party," founded 1919, from contraction of Communist International and modeled on Russian Komintern.

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madame 

formal term of address to a lady, 1590s, see madam, which is an earlier borrowing of the same French phrase. Originally a title of respect for a woman of rank, now given to any married woman. It is more formal or affected than madam. OED recommends madam as an English title, madame in reference to foreign women.

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