Etymology
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formative (adj.)

late 15c., from French formatif, from Latin format-, past-participle stem of formare "to form," from forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)). As a noun, in grammar, from 1816.

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unformed (adj.)
early 14c., from un- (1) "not" + past-participle adjective from form (v.).
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fusiform (adj.)
"spindle-shaped," 1746, from Latin fusus "a spindle" (see fuse (n.)) + -form.
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hominiform (adj.)
"of human shape," 1670s, from stem of Latin homo (see homunculus) + -form.
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variform (adj.)
1660s, from Latin varius (see vary) + forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)).
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linguiform (adj.)
"tongue-shaped," 1753, from Latin lingua "tongue" (from PIE root *dnghu- "tongue") + -form.
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landform (n.)
1889 (earlier in German); see land (n.) + form (n.). Perhaps immediately from German Landform.
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format (n.)
1840, "shape and size" (of a book), via French format (18c.), ultimately from Modern Latin liber formatus "a book formed" in a certain shape and size, from past participle of formare "to form," from forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)). Extended to computers by 1955.
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Formosa 
old name of Taiwan, given by the Portuguese, from Portuguese Formosa insula "beautiful island." The adjective is from the fem. of Latin formosus "beautiful, handsome, finely formed," from forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)). Related: Formosan (1640s).
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aviform (adj.)

"bird-shaped, resembling a bird," 1885, from Latin avis "bird" (from PIE root *awi- "bird") + -form.

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