Etymology
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barbaric (adj.)

late 15c., "uncultured, uncivilized, unpolished," from French barbarique (15c.), from Latin barbaricus "foreign, strange, outlandish," from Greek barbarikos "like a foreigner," from barbaros "foreign, rude" (see barbarian (n.)). The meaning "pertaining to or characteristic of barbarians" is from 1660s. Related: Barbarically.

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Comanche (n.)

Native-American people from the southwestern Great Plains, 1819, from Spanish, from a word in a Shoshonean language, such as Ute kimánci "enemy, foreigner." Their territory was Comancheria. Comanchero was a 19c. name given to Hispanic and American traders who dealt with the Comanches.

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hostile (adj.)

late 15c., from French hostile "of or belonging to an enemy" (15c.) or directly from Latin hostilis "of an enemy, belonging to or characteristic of the enemy; inimical," from hostis, in earlier use "a stranger, foreigner," in classical use "an enemy," from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host." The noun meaning "hostile person" is recorded from 1838, American English, a word from the Indian wars. Related: Hostilely.

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barbarize (v.)

1640s, "speak or write like a barbarian," also "make barbarous," from Late Latin barbarizare, from Greek barbarizein "to do as a foreigner does," from barbaros "foreign, rude" (see barbarian (n.)). The meaning "corrupt a language by departing from standards" is from 1728. Related: Barbarized; barbarizing; barbarization.

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hostility (n.)

early 15c., hostilite, "hostile action," from Old French hostilité "enmity" (15c.), or directly from Late Latin hostilitatem (nominative hostilitas) "enmity," from Latin hostilis "inimical," from hostis, in earlier use "a stranger, foreigner," in classical use "an enemy," from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host." Hostilities in the sense of "warfare" attested from 1610s.

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philhellene (adj.)

1824, "a friend of Greece, a foreigner who supports and assists the cause of the Greeks," from Greek philhellēn, from philos "loving" (see philo-) + Hellēnes "the Greeks" (compare Hellenic). Originally in English in reference to the cause of Greek independence; later also with reference to Greek literature or language. Related: Philhellenic; Philhellenism.

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aubaine (n.)

"right of French kings to claim the property of a non-naturalized stranger who dies in their realm," 1727, from French (droit d'aubaine), from aubain "stranger, non-naturalized foreigner" (12c.), which is of unknown origin; perhaps from Medieval Latin Albanus, but the sense is obscure. Klein suggests Frankish *alibanus, literally "belonging to another ban." Abolished 1819.

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Galloway 

district in southwestern Scotland (Medieval Latin Gallovidia), equivalent to Welsh Gallwyddel, Irish Gallgaidhil, literally "foreign Gaels," containing the Gal- element also common in Irish place-names (Irish Gaelic gall) and meaning there "a stranger, a foreigner," especially an Englishman. Related: Gallovidian, which is from the Latin form of the name. The adjective Galwegian is on analogy of Norwegian.

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peregrinate (v.)

"to travel from place to place," 1590s, from Latin peregrinatus, past participle of peregrinari "to travel abroad, be alien," figuratively "to wander, roam, travel about," from peregrinus "from foreign parts, foreigner," from peregre (adv.) "abroad," properly "from abroad, found outside Roman territory," from per "away" (see per) + agri, locative of ager "field, territory, land, country" (from PIE root *agro- "field").

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outcome (n.)

1788, "that which results from something," originally Scottish, from the verbal phrase; see out (adv.) + come (v.). Popularized in English by Carlyle (c. 1830s). It was used in Middle English in sense of "an emergence, act or fact of coming out" (c. 1200), and the gerund, outcoming, was used as "an issue, a result." Old English had utancumen (n.) "stranger, foreigner."

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