Etymology
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forge (v.2)

1769 (with an apparent isolated use from 1610s), "make way, move ahead," of unknown origin, perhaps an alteration of force (v.), but perhaps rather from forge (n.), via notion of steady hammering at something. Originally nautical, in reference to vessels.

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enforce (v.)

mid-14c., "to drive by physical force; to try, attempt, strive; to fortify, strengthen a place;" late 14c. as "exert force, compel; make stronger, reinforce; strengthen an argument; grow stronger, become violent," from Old French enforcier "strengthen, reinforce; use force (on), offer violence (to); oppress; violate, rape" (12c.) or a native formation from en- (1) "make, put in" + force (n.). Meaning "compel obedience to" (a law, etc.) is from 1640s. Related: Enforced; enforcing.

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forcemeat (n.)

also force-meat, "mincemeat, meat chopped fine and seasoned," 1680s, from force "to stuff," a variant of farce (q.v.) + meat.

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dynamic (n.)

"energetic force; motive force," 1894, from dynamic (adj.). As "manner of interaction," by 1978.

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AEF 

also A.E.F., abbreviation of American Expeditionary Force, the U.S. military force sent to Europe in 1917 during World War I.

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coact (v.)

"to compel, force," c. 1400, from Latin coactare "constrain, force," frequentative of cogere (past participle coactus) "to compel," also "curdle, collect" (see cogent). Related: Coacted; coacting; coaction; coactive. 

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prize (v.2)

"to force or press; force open by means of a lever," 1680s, from prize (n.) "the hold of a lever" (14c.), from Old French prise "a taking hold, a grasp" (see prize (n.2)). Related: Prized; prizing.

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slam (v.)

1690s, "to beat, slap;" 1775 as "to shut with force," from slam (n.1). Meaning "throw or push with force" is from 1870. Meaning "say uncomplimentary things about" is from 1916. Related: Slammed; slamming.

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voltage (n.)

"electromotive force reckoned in volts," 1882, from volt + -age.

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dynamics (n.)

as a branch of physics that calculates motions in accordance with the laws of force, by 1752, from dynamic (adj.); also see -ics. As "the moving physical or moral force in anything," by 1833.

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