Etymology
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fly-by-night (n.)
1796, slang, said by Grose to be an old term of reproach to a woman signifying that she was a witch; used from 1823 in reference to anyone who departs hastily from a recent activity, especially while owing money. The different senses involve the two verbs fly.
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flyway (n.)
"bird migration path," 1891, from fly (v.1) + way (n.).
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fled 
past tense and past participle of flee (q.v.) and fly (v.2).
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barfly (n.)
"habitual drunkard," 1910, from bar (n.2) + fly (n.).
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superfly (adj.)
"excellent, superior," 1971, originally African-American vernacular, from super- + slang sense of fly (adj.).
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housefly (n.)
also house-fly, "Musca domestica," early 15c., from house (n.) + fly (n.).
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flywheel (n.)
also fly-wheel, "heavy-rimmed revolving wheel to regulate motion," 1784, from fly (n.) "speed-regulating device" (1590s, from fly (v.1)) + wheel (n.).
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horsefly (n.)
also horse-fly, type of insect extremely annoying to horses and cattle, late 14c., from horse (n.) + fly (n.).
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flypaper (n.)
also fly-paper, 1851 (the thing itself is said to have become commonly available in London in 1848), from fly (n.1) + paper (n.).
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