Etymology
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flashing (n.)

1791, "act of creating an artificial flood," verbal noun from flash (v.); also compare flash (n.2)). Meaning "indecent exposure" is by 1968 (see flasher). The meaning "strip of metal used in roofing, etc." is from 1782, earlier simply flash (1570s), but the sense connection is unclear and it might be an unrelated word.

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refulgent (adj.)

"brilliant, emitting bright light," c. 1500, from Old French refulgent and directly from Latin refulgentem (nominative refulgens), present participle of refulgere "flash back, shine brilliantly," from re- "back" (see re-) + fulgere "to shine" (from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn"). Related: Refulgently.

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flashlight (n.)

also flash-light, 1886, "on-and-off signal light in a light-house, etc.," from flash (v.) + light (n.). As the word for a photographer's light-emitting preparation, 1892 (flash-lamp in this sense is by 1890). From 1905 as as a handheld, pocket-sized electric illumination device, the American English word for what the British might call an electric torch.

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flashing (adj.)

1540s, of light; present-participle adjective from flash (v.).

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fulgent (adj.)

"bright, dazzling," early 15c., from Latin fulgentem (nominative fulgens) "shining, bright, dazzling," present participle of fulgere "to shine" (from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn." Related: Fulgently.

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glance (n.)

c. 1500, "a sudden movement producing a flash," from glance (v.). Meaning "brief or hurried look" is from 1590s.

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effulgence (n.)

1660s (Milton), from Late Latin effulgentia, from Latin effulgentem (nominative effulgens), present participle of effulgere "to shine out, gleam forth," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fulgere (from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn").

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effulgent (adj.)

1738, back-formation from effulgence, or else from Latin effulgentem (nominative effulgens), present participle of effulgere "to shine out, gleam forth," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fulgere "to shine" (from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn"). Related: Effulgently.

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flashback (n.)

also flash-back, 1903 in reference to fires in engines or furnaces, from verbal phrase (1902), from flash (v.) + back (adv.). Movie plot device sense is from 1916. The hallucinogenic drug sense is attested in psychological literature from 1970, which means probably hippies were using it a few years before.

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flasher (n.)

1680s, "something that emits light in flashes," agent noun from flash (v.). Meaning "male genital exhibitionist" is from 1960s (meat-flasher in this sense was attested in 1890s and flash (v.) in the sense "expose the genitals" is recorded by 1846). Johnson (1755) has it also in the sense "one who makes a show of more wit than he possesses."

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