Etymology
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poniard (n.)

"a dagger or other short, stabbing weapon," 1580s, from French poinard (early 16c.), from Old French poignal "dagger," literally "anything grasped with the fist," from poing "fist," from Latin pungus "a fist" (from suffixed form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). Probably altered in French by association with poindre "to stab." Compare Latin pugnus "fist," pugio "dagger." As a verb from c. 1600, "to stab with or as if with a poniard."

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belly-punch (n.)
also bellypunch, "fist-blow to the stomach," 1811, from belly (n.) + punch (n.3).
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brawl (n.)
mid-15c., "noisy disturbance," from brawl (v.). Meaning "fist-fight" is by 1873.
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sock (n.2)
"a blow, a hit with the fist," 1700, from or related to sock (v.1).
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tae kwon do 
1967, from Korean, said to represent tae "kick" + kwon "fist" + do "art, way, method."
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slug (v.)
"deliver a hard blow with the fist," 1862, from slug (n.3). Related: Slugged; slugging. Slugging-match is from 1878.
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*peuk- 
also *peug-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to prick."

It forms all or part of: appoint; appointment; bung; compunction; contrapuntal; expugn; expunge; impugn; interpunction; oppugn; pink; poignant; point; pointe; pointillism; poniard; pounce; pugilism; pugilist; pugnacious; pugnacity; punch (n.1) "pointed tool for making holes or embossing;" punch (n.3) "a quick blow with the fist;" punch (v.) "to hit with the fist;" puncheon (n.2) "pointed tool for punching or piercing;" punctilio; punctilious; punctual; punctuate; punctuation; puncture; pungent; punty; Pygmy; repugn; repugnance; repugnant.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek pyx "with clenched fist," pygme "fist, boxing," pyktes "boxer;" Latin pugnare "to fight," especially with the fists, pungere "to pierce, prick."
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pud (n.2)

"hand, paw, fist," 1650s, "a nursery word," according to OED. It has been compared to Dutch poot "paw;" see paw (n.).

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pugnacity (n.)

"disposition to fight, quarrelsomeness," c. 1600, from Latin pugnacitas "fondness for fighting," from pugnax (genitive pugnacis) "combative," from pugnare "to fight," especially with the fists, "contend against," from pugnus "a fist" (from PIE *pung-, nasalized form of root *peuk- "to prick").

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duke (v.)

"to hit, strike with the fist," by 1952, slang, from dukes. Related: Duked; duking. To duke it out "fight with fisticuffs" is by 1971.

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