Etymology
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fire-engine (n.)

1680s, "engine designed to throw a stream of water through a hose onto a fire for the purpose of extinguishing it," from fire (n.) + engine (n.). Also an early name for a steam engine (1722).

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fire-drill (n.)

1865, originally a device for making fire by the twirled stick method, from fire (n.) + drill (n.1). Meaning "rehearsal of what to do in a fire" is from 1884 (originally it also involved fighting the fire), from drill (n.) in the "agreed-upon procedure" sense (see drill (v.)).

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firepower (n.)

also fire-power "effectiveness of military fire," 1891, from fire (n.) + power (n.).

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pyrophobia (n.)

"morbid fear of fire," 1871, from pyro- "fire" + -phobia "fear."

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igneous (adj.)

1660s, "pertaining to or resembling fire," from Latin igneus "of fire, fiery; on fire; burning hot," figuratively "ardent, vehement," from ignis "fire, a fire," extended to "brightness, splendor, glow;" figuratively "rage, fury, passion," from PIE root *egni- "fire" (source also of Sanskrit agnih "fire, sacrificial fire," Old Church Slavonic ogni, Lithuanian ugnis "fire"). Geological meaning "produced by volcanic forces" is from 1791, originally in distinction from aqueous. Earlier in the sense "fiery" were ignean (1630s), ignic (1610s).

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firewood (n.)

also fire-wood, late 14c., from fire (n.) + wood (n.).

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fireball (n.)

also fire-ball, 1550s, from fire (n.) + ball (n.1).

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firelight (n.)

also fire-light, "light emitted by an open fire," Old English fyrleoht; see fire (n.) + light (n.).

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firetrap (n.)

also fire-trap, "place at great risk of destruction by fire and with insufficient means of escape," 1882, from fire (n.) + trap (n.).

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firefighter (n.)

also fire-fighter, 1895, from fire (n.) + fighter.

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