Etymology
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hexagram (n.)

1826 as a type of geometric figure, from hexa- + -gram. I Ching sense attested from 1804.

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onnagata (n.)

in Kabuki and similar drama, a man who plays female roles, 1901, from Japanese, from onna "woman" + kata "figure."

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gammadion (n.)

ornamental figure formed of four capital gammas, Medieval Greek gammadion, diminutive of Greek gamma (see gamma).

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scrollwork (n.)

"ornamental work in which scrolls or scroll-like lines figure," 1822, from scroll (n.) + work (n.).

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schematize (v.)

"formulate in a regular order," 1866, from Latinized form of Greek skhēmatizein, from stem of skhēma "figure, appearance" (see scheme (n.)). Related: Schematization.

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disfigure (v.)
Origin and meaning of disfigure

late 14c., "mar the external figure of, impair the beauty, symmetry, or excellence of," also "transform the appearance of, disguise," from Old French desfigurer "disfigure, alter, disguise, destroy," from Medieval Latin diffigurare, from assimilated form of Latin dis- (see dis-) + figurare "to form, shape," from figura "a shape, form, figure" (from PIE root *dheigh- "to form, build"). Related: Disfigured; disfiguring; disfiguration.

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oval (n.)

1560s, "a plane figure in the general shape of the lengthwise outline of an egg," from French ovalle "oval figure," from noun use of Medieval Latin ovalis "of or pertaining to an egg," from Latin ovum "egg" (see ovary). The earliest use of the word in English (mid-15c.) was in reference to a Roman crown awarded as the symbol of an ovatio (see ovation).

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suss (v.)

"to figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect" (1953, police jargon), a slang shortening of suspect (v.). Related: Sussed.

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salchow (n.)

type of skating jump, by 1921, named for Swedish figure skater Ulrich Salchow (1877-1949).

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decussate (v.)

"to intersect so as to form a figure like the letter X, to cross," 1650s, from Latin decussatus, past participle of decussare "to divide crosswise, to cross in the form of an 'X,'" from decussis "the figure 'ten'" (in Roman numerals, represented by X), also "a large copper coin ten times the value of an as," from decem "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten"). Related: Decussated; decussating; decussation. As an adjective, by 1806.

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