Etymology
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antipyretic (n.)

"that which reduces fever," 1680s, from anti- + Greek pyretos "fever, burning heat," related to pyr "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire") + -ic. As an adjective, "reducing fever," 1837.

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ague (n.)

c. 1300, "acute fever," also (late 14c.) "malarial fever (involving episodes of chills and shivering)" from Old French ague "acute fever," from Medieval Latin (febris) acuta "sharp (fever)," from fem. of acutus "sharp" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").

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pyrexia (n.)

"fever, a higher bodily temperature than is normal," 1769, medical Latin, from Greek pyrexis "feverishness," from pyressein "to be feverish, to be ill of fever," from pyretos "fever, burning heat" (related to pyr "fire," from PIE root *paewr- "fire") + abstract noun ending -ia. Formerly sometimes nativized as pyrexy. Related: Pyrexial; pyrexic; pyrexical.

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antifebrile (n.)

also anti-febrile, 1660s, "having the property of abating fever," from anti- + febrile. As a noun, "substance which abates fever," 1859.

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pyretic (adj.)

"characterized by or affected with fever," 1809, from French pyrétique or directly from Modern Latin pyreticus, from Greek pyretos "fever, burning heat," related to pyr "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire"). As a noun, "a pyretic agent," from 1728.

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typhus (n.)

acute infectious fever, usually accompanied by prostration, delirium, and small reddish spots, 1785, from medical Latin, from Greek typhos "stupor caused by fever," literally "smoke," from typhein "to smoke," related to typhos "blind," typhon "whirlwind," from PIE *dheubh-, perhaps an extended form of PIE root *dheu- (1) "dust, vapor, smoke." 

The Greek term [typhos] (smoke, mist, fog) was employed by Hippocrates to define a confused state of the intellect, with a tendency to stupor (stupor attonitus); and in this sense it is aptly applied to typhus fever with its slow cerebration and drowsy stupor. Boissier de Sauvages first (in 1760) called this fever "typhus," and the name was adopted by Cullen of Edinburgh in 1769. Previous to the time of de Sauvages typhus was known as "Pestilential" or "Putrid Fever," or by some name suggested by the eruption, or expressive of the locality in which it appeared, as "Camp," "Jail," "Hospital," or "Ship Fever" (Murchison). [Thomas Clifford, ed., "A System of Medicine," New York, 1897]

Related: typhous (adj.).

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pyrogen (n.)

1858, as a proposed word for "electricity considered as a material substance possessing weight," from pyro- + -gen. Meaning "fever-producer, substance which, introduced into the blood, induces fever" is from 1896. Related: Pyrogenic. Greek pyrogenes meant "born in fire, wrought by fire" (compare pyrogenesis).

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shiver (n.1)

"a tremulous, quivering motion, a shaking fit of the body," 1727, from shiver (v.1). The shivers in reference to an attack of fever chills is from 1861.

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quotidian (adj.)

mid-14c., coitidian, "daily, occurring or returning daily," from Old French cotidiien (Modern French quotidien), from Latin cottidianus, quotidianus "daily," from Latin quotus "how many? which in order or number?" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) + dies "day" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine").

The qu- spelling in English dates from 16c. Meaning "ordinary, commonplace, trivial" is from mid-15c. Quotidian fever "intermittent fever" is from late 14c. The noun meaning "something that returns or is expected every day" is from c. 1400, originally of fevers.

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frisson (n.)

"emotional thrill," 1777 (Walpole), from French frisson "fever, illness; shiver, thrill" (12c.), from Latin frigere "to be cold" (see frigid). Scant record of the word in English between Walpole's use and 1888.

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