Etymology
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ogress (n.)

"a female ogre," 1713; see ogre + -ess.

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anchoress (n.)

"female recluse, nun," late 14c.; see anchorite + -ess.

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alumna (n.)

"female pupil or graduate of a school," 1860, fem. of alumnus (q.v.).

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confidante (n.)

1709, "female confidant," from French confidente, fem. of confident (see confidant).

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maidservant (n.)

also maid-servant, "female servant," 1520s, from maid (n.) + servant.

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Bacchae (n.)

"female attendants of Bacchus," from Greek Bakkhai, plural of Bakkhē, from Bakkhos (see Bacchus).

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governess (n.)

mid-15c., "female ruler," shortening of governouresse "a woman who rules" (late 14c.), from Old French governeresse "female ruler or administrator" (see governor + -ess). The Latin fem, form was gubernatrix. In the sense of "a female teacher in a private home" governess it is attested from 1712, probably as a fem. of governor in the now-obsolete sense "one who has charge of a young man's education and activities, a tutor" (1570s).

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she-devil (n.)

"difficult woman," 1840, from she + devil (n.). Deviless "female devil" is from 1640s.

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gyneco- 

also gynaeco-, before a vowel gynec-, word-forming element meaning "woman, female," from Latinized form of Greek gynaiko-, combining form of gynē "woman, female," from PIE root *gwen- "woman." Also see æ (1).

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