Etymology
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fanzine (n.)

1949, from fan (n.2) + suffix abstracted from magazine.

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gramophile (n.)

fan of gramophone records, 1922, from gramophone + -phile.

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date (n.2)

"fruit of the date-palm," c. 1300, from Old French date, from Old Provençal datil, from Latin dactylus, from Greek daktylos "date," originally "finger, toe." Said to be so called because of fancied resemblance between oblong fruit of the date palm and human digits, but some say it is from the resemblance of the plant's leaves to the palm of the hand. It's also possible that this sense of daktylos is a word from a Semitic source (compare Hebrew deqel, Aramaic diqla, Arabic daqal "date palm") that has been assimilated by folk-etymology to the Greek word for "finger." Date-palm is from 1837; the earlier word was date-tree (c. 1400).

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fandom (n.)

"the realm of avid enthusiasts," 1903, from fan (n.2) + -dom.

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palmy (adj.)

"triumphant, flourishing," literally "worthy of the palm" (of victory or triumph), c. 1600, from palm (n.2) in the "triumph" sense + -y (2). The meaning "full of palms" attested from 1660s.

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tamarind (n.)

c. 1400, "fruit of the tamarind tree, used medicinally," ultimately from Arabic tamr hindi, literally "date of India," from hind "India." First element cognate with Hebrew tamar "palm tree, date palm." Of the tree itself, from 1610s.

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winnow (v.)

late 14c., from Old English windwian "to fan, winnow," from wind "air in motion, paring down," see wind (n.1). Cognate with Old Norse vinza, Old High German winton "to fan, winnow," Gothic diswinþjan "to throw (grain) apart."

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palmer (n.)

"pilgrim; itinerant monk going from shrine to shrine under a perpetual vow of poverty;" originally "pilgrim who has returned from the Holy Land," c. 1300, palmere (mid-12c. as a surname), from Anglo-French palmer (Old French palmier), from Medieval Latin palmarius, from Latin palma "palm tree" (see palm (n.2)). So called because they wore palm branches in commemoration of the journey. "The distinction between pilgrim and palmer seems never to have been closely observed" [Century Dictionary].

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fanboy (n.)

"young male enthusiast," by 1988, from fan (n.2) + boy. Fangirl attested from 1989.

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Sabal (n.)

a genus of fan-palms of tropical Americas, 1763, said to be from a South American or Mexican name.

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