Etymology
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patriarch (n.)

late 12c., patriarke, "one of the Old Testament fathers," progenitors of the Israelites, from Old French patriarche (11c.) and directly from Late Latin patriarcha (Tertullian), from Greek patriarkhēs "chief or head of a family," from patria "family, clan," from pater "father" (see father (n.)) + arkhein "to rule" (see archon). Also used as an honorific title of certain bishops of the highest rank in the early Church, notably those of Antioch, Alexandria, and Rome. The meaning "the father and ruler of a family" is by 1817.

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Hestia 

goddess of the hearth, from Greek hestia "hearth, house, home, family" (see vestal).

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Goudy 

typeface family, 1917, from name of U.S. typographer Frederic W. Goudy (1865-1947).

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atheling (n.)

"member of a noble family," Old English æðling, from æðel "noble family, race, ancestry; nobility, honor," related to Old English æðele "noble," from Proto-Germanic *athala- (cognates: Old Frisian edila "(great-)grandfather," Old Saxon athali "noble descent, property," Old High German adal "noble family"), which is perhaps from PIE *at-al- "race, family," from *at(i)- "over, beyond, super" + *al- "to nourish." With suffix -ing "belonging to." A common Germanic word, cognates include Old Saxon ediling, Old Frisian etheling, Old High German adaling.

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Dubonnet (n.)

sweet French aperitif, by 1901, trademark name, from the name of a family of French wine merchants.

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royal (n.)

"royal person," c. 1400, from royal (adj.). Specifically "member of the royal family" from 1774, colloquial.

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Paige 

fem. proper name, also a family name, variant of page (n.2) "young servant."

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gentility (n.)

mid-14c., "nobility of birth, gentle birth," from Old French gentilité (14c.), from Latin gentilitatem (nominative gentilitas) "relationship in the same family or clan," from gentilis "of the same family or clan" (see gentle; also compare gentry). From 1640s as "social superiority." Meaning "state of being gentile" is rare.

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ani (n.)

black bird of the cuckoo family native to the American tropics, 1829, from Spanish or Portuguese ani, from Tupi.

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Amharic (n.)

principal language of Ethiopia, 1813, from Amhara, name of a central province in Ethiopia. It is in the Semitic family.

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